Thread Number: 34213
GE 7 cu ft electric dryer
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Post# 513681   4/25/2011 at 16:56 (4,604 days old) by the7 ()        

New GE GTMP400EMWS dryer.

I bought a new GE 7 cu ft electric dryer to replace an 16 year old Kenmore dryer (with top lint filter) because the old dryer occasionally causes brownish marks on the collar tips of shirts.

Apparently the tips of the shirts were caught in the gap between the rotating drum and the stationary back plate. The gap of the old dryer will get wider due to the wearing-out of the felts/supports at the rear and at the front of the drum. So I decided to replace the old dryer.

The construction of the rear end of the GE drum is completely different from that of the old Kenmore. There will be no gap at the rear to catch the tips of the shirts.

The new GE 7 cu ft dryer seems to hold a bit more clothing than (say about 5% to 10% more than) the old Kenmore. It takes about 48 min to dry a load of cotton clothing using the normal cotton sensor cycle.

I think that the design of the drum of GE is better but the overall construction of the Kenmore/Whirlpool is better.





Post# 514116 , Reply# 1   4/27/2011 at 07:44 (4,602 days old) by combo52 (50 Year Repair Tech Beltsville,Md)        
DRYER CONSTRUCTION QUALITY

combo52's profile picture

I am glad you like your new dryer but the construction and durability of your old dryer was much better than the GE dryers of the last 15 years or so. There is a gap all the way around the front of your new GE that gets bigger at the bottom half and starts staining clothes that get caught there, I just fixed one last week that was 9 years old and it is much more expensive and less satisfactory a repair than replacing the rear drum seal on a WP built dryer.


Post# 514118 , Reply# 2   4/27/2011 at 07:56 (4,602 days old) by logixx (Germany)        
Euro vs. US

logixx's profile picture
I find it rather interesting that the back and front parts of US dryer drums typically remain stationary, while most Euro dryers rotate the entire drum. Wonder why that is?

Post# 514127 , Reply# 3   4/27/2011 at 09:12 (4,602 days old) by yogitunes (New Jersey)        

yogitunes's profile picture
Don't kid yourself!!!.....you may not have the GAP that was seen in the rear of the Whirlpool.....but you'll have even more fun and damaged clothes from the gap at the front of your GE, just wait......mine started doing this in the first year, always grabbed a washcloth, sock, or button on jeans, and twisted the heck out of them until they ripped, you wouldn't notice it until the load was done and you opened the door......

NOT to mention, the rear is where the heat comes in, this back panel gets scorching HOT, a full load of towels or a blanket will melt from constant contact, best to stay with medium or low heat for almost all loads, and will take a little longer to dry....at least with your Whirlpool, the clothes slid along the stationary back panel, while a small built in ramp tossed the clothes away from the heat source.....

ALSO, most Whirlpool/Kenmores had a soft heat feature dropping down the temp for minimizing wrinkles...an exclusive other manufacturers don't have


Post# 514130 , Reply# 4   4/27/2011 at 09:23 (4,602 days old) by combo52 (50 Year Repair Tech Beltsville,Md)        
DRYER DRUMS

combo52's profile picture

Many American dryer drums are one piece, the GE that we are talking about the only thing that doesn't revolve is the front of the machine and the door. The most successful and safest dryer designs have stationary fronts and or back areas. All MTs after 1976, all WP built after 1966, all Nogre built after 1980, all Speed Queen home and commercial after 1980. Having stationary areas where the heat enters the drum, this allows better clothing protection from excessive heat of having the whole rear of the drum  become super heated. It is also a less expensive way to build a dryer which is one of many reasons that 80+% of US homes have and use dryers. US dryers are by far and away the best in the world.


Post# 514213 , Reply# 5   4/27/2011 at 17:51 (4,602 days old) by the7 ()        

Dear yogitunes

Could you tell me the model no of your 1 year old GE dryer?

Dear combo52

Could you remember the model no of the 9 year old dryer?




Post# 514217 , Reply# 6   4/27/2011 at 18:04 (4,602 days old) by the7 ()        

Please note my GE is of the new style (not of old style from Frigidaire).

See diagram attached.


Post# 514232 , Reply# 7   4/27/2011 at 19:13 (4,601 days old) by dadoes (TX,U.S. of A.)        

dadoes's profile picture

 

That is not a "new" design.  I have a 1999 GE/Camco-sourced F&P DE04 dryer that looks exactly the same, and a GE DS4500EB0WW manuf'd 2002 per the S/N.  The GE I got for free, and refurbished it with $210 in parts -- front drum support & bearings, rear bearing sleeve, inner door panel, heating element, front air duct/filter housing, idler pulley.


Post# 514236 , Reply# 8   4/27/2011 at 19:31 (4,601 days old) by toploader55 (Massachusetts Sand Bar, Cape Cod)        
Just bought yesterday,

toploader55's profile picture
New Kenmore Dryer.

7.0 cu ft. Capacity, around $400.00. Love it. Runs Great, on every Cycle. Great Daily Driver which I needed going into the summer. Model # 110.61202010.

Just does it all without spending $800.00 +. I just can't see spending that kind of money on a dryer. It's Perfect for my needs.

What's up with these $1000.00 plus dryers ? Just need dry clothes.


Post# 514326 , Reply# 9   4/28/2011 at 05:45 (4,601 days old) by Tomturbomatic (Beltsville, MD)        

I wonder if part of the inflated price for dryers is the cabinet changes they are making to keep the dryers matching all of the variations in the fronts of the new FL washers. American-made dryers would go decades in some cases with only minor trim changes to the front panel.

Post# 514343 , Reply# 10   4/28/2011 at 07:54 (4,601 days old) by combo52 (50 Year Repair Tech Beltsville,Md)        
PRICES OF NEW DRYERS

combo52's profile picture

I think that there are several factors that are allowing the price of new dryers to equal that of the matching dryer.

1 People are so used to having a dryer that they are willing to pay the price.

2 People wrongly assume that a new dryer will work better and be more energy efficient.

3 the energy-star washers are being subsidized by the goverment, state, utilities which makes them cheaper than they would otherwise be.

4 The building and assembly of the new washer designs that have come out is very automated compared to the building and assembly of clothes dryers.

5 The manufactories are making more money on the sale of dryers than washers which is way they are being pushed in pairs. I am sure that they would love to sell you a new stove to go with that new washer and dryer LOl.

In many cases it will be cheaper and work better to keep your old dryer or buy a more sensible rear control machine than buying one that matches the new washer. Many new dryers are actually smaller inside than the older wider machines and a larger diameter drum seems to work better than the deeper ones in the newer 27" machines.

 


Post# 514381 , Reply# 11   4/28/2011 at 12:06 (4,601 days old) by the7 ()        

Thanks combo52 for the valuable info.

It seems there are two heating elements in the GE 7 cu ft dryer.
Wonder if you know the wattage of them and why it uses two instead of one?



Post# 514664 , Reply# 12   4/29/2011 at 19:52 (4,599 days old) by gr81nknox ()        
interesting observation

Last fall my parents bought a new Kenmore pair, washer model 2800 and dryer 6800. The washer was the Kenmore version of the 4.3 cubic foot Cabrio and the Dryer was the matching dryer(7.0 I believe). While the washer is all new, the dryer is basically the same dryer as the 1995 90 Series model it replaced. Aside from the electronic controls and more rounded look of the cabinet, it looks the same. The drum, the drum light, the filter location, even the mechanical sounds it makes are nearly identical to their old one as well as my 2002 Elite. The price certainly isn't the same, as they paid close to $600 for it. I will give it that it dries clothes quicker than the old one, but that may be attributed more to the higher spin speed of the new washer.

Post# 514666 , Reply# 13   4/29/2011 at 20:12 (4,599 days old) by DADoES (TX,U.S. of A.)        

dadoes's profile picture

 

Some Maytag Bravos dryers have a high-velocity belt-driven blower that makes for longer venting allowances and/or faster drying.


Post# 514887 , Reply# 14   5/1/2011 at 09:26 (4,598 days old) by the7 ()        

After using the new dryer for several days, my wife is quite happy with the new dryer because the clothing dried from the new dryer are softer than from the old dryer.

Post# 516045 , Reply# 15   5/6/2011 at 16:49 (4,593 days old) by the7 ()        

There are two heating elements in this GE dryer.
It seems that the dryer will cycle only one heating element ON/OFF to maintain a desirable drying temperature while the other heating element is always ON during the drying cycle.
In such manner, the drying temperature variation will be less than that of the other dryer using one heating element.


Post# 516894 , Reply# 16   5/10/2011 at 18:51 (4,589 days old) by the7 ()        

I bought a digital thermometer to measure the outlet temperature of the GE dryer.
The sensor was placed in the lint tray.
The setting was in normal cotton cycle with a typical cotton/mixed load.

A) From 0 to 10 min, the temp was increasing slowly from 68F to 113F (47F increase)

B) From 10 to 20 min, the temp was increasing very slowly from 113F to 118F (only 5F increase).

C) From 20 to 32 min, the temp was increasing slowly from 118F to 149F (31F increase).
During the periods of A, B and C, the inlet thermostat was cutting IN/OUT one of the heating element to maintain the set-temperature of the inlet.

D) From 32 min to 50 min, the outlet thermostat took over to the set-temperature of the outlet. The outlet temp as measured varied from 136F to 154F. When the temp exceeded 154F, both heating elements were cut OUT (OFF). When the temp fell below 136F, both heating elements were cut IN (ON).

E)From 50 min to 56 min (cooling down period) the outlet temp fell slowly to 104F and at 56 min the buzzer sounded to end the drying cycle.



Post# 516898 , Reply# 17   5/10/2011 at 19:03 (4,588 days old) by the7 ()        

The sensor in the lint tray.

Post# 516900 , Reply# 18   5/10/2011 at 19:05 (4,588 days old) by the7 ()        

The digital thermostat.


Post# 516904 , Reply# 19   5/10/2011 at 19:09 (4,588 days old) by the7 ()        

It should be a digital thermometer.

Post# 516908 , Reply# 20   5/10/2011 at 19:28 (4,588 days old) by combo52 (50 Year Repair Tech Beltsville,Md)        
NEW GE DRYER

combo52's profile picture

During periods A & B one heater should not be cutting on and off at such a low outlet temperature, you likely have too long an exhaust system or other problem with the exhaust system. If you want to get the best life and performance out of this dryer make sure your exhaust installation meets GEs recommendations in every way, A bad exhaust system likely contributed to the problem with rusting rear seals on the old KM dryer.


Post# 516927 , Reply# 21   5/10/2011 at 21:02 (4,588 days old) by toploader55 (Massachusetts Sand Bar, Cape Cod)        
New Kenmore Dryer.

toploader55's profile picture
Well, I've had it for a couple of weeks now, and after 7 loads of Laundry of all types, It Ranks with me as one of the Best Dryers I've ever owned. 40-50 minutes tops per load. Heavy Bath mats... 50 minutes. Cotton anything, 40 minutes.

Just love it, and still can't see spending 900+ for a Dryer. Just Old Fasion here. (And getting Older).


Post# 516931 , Reply# 22   5/10/2011 at 21:10 (4,588 days old) by coldspot66 (Plymouth, Mass)        

Like I've always said, W/P Kenmore 29" dryers are the best at any $$$. Eddie, that model has a moisture sensor, do you use the moisture sensing cycle? There is a small circuit board in the console for moisture sensing.

Post# 516955 , Reply# 23   5/10/2011 at 22:37 (4,588 days old) by syndets2000 (Nanjemoy, MD)        
moisture sensor...

...setting is what I use on the WP (I found behind a store some years ago), during the winter- I line dry during the summer, its only for two people-


Post# 516960 , Reply# 24   5/10/2011 at 23:32 (4,588 days old) by the7 ()        

combo52
Thanks for the advice. Will check the venting against the requirement.


Post# 516969 , Reply# 25   5/11/2011 at 00:36 (4,588 days old) by the7 ()        

For GE electric dryer, there are
a)one Safety Thermostat at the inlet which will cut off "both" heating elements when overheat
b)one Control Inlet Thermostat at the inlet which will switch ON/OFF "only one" heating element to maintain the inlet set-temperature and
c)one Drum Outlet Thermostat at the outlet which will switch ON/OFF "both" heating elements to maintain the outlet set-temperature.

There are two heating elements (say about 2700 watts each at 240V) in the GE dryer.


Post# 516984 , Reply# 26   5/11/2011 at 06:01 (4,588 days old) by aquarius1984 (Planet earth)        
US dryers are by far and away the best in the world.

aquarius1984's profile picture
Combo52 thats quite a statement - you must of used hundreds of dryers in your vacations out of America!

When did you visit the UK and how did your find your trip here?

If it was recent you should have spoken up and you could of come to play with our collection.
More than welcome anytime to though if you plan a return journey.

Just curious as to how you found the British made machines that you have used and where you felt their downfall was?





Post# 516989 , Reply# 27   5/11/2011 at 06:27 (4,588 days old) by toploader55 (Massachusetts Sand Bar, Cape Cod)        
Moisture Sensor.

toploader55's profile picture
Yes John, I use the sensor cycle. I was keeping my eye on the clock to see how long the avaerage cycle tales. It also has the Wrinkle Guard feature as well.

If I wash a "Normal" load in the 806 then put it in the dryer by the time the second load is washed the clothes are just about dry.


Post# 517008 , Reply# 28   5/11/2011 at 08:08 (4,588 days old) by combo52 (50 Year Repair Tech Beltsville,Md)        
US VS EUROPEAN DRYERS

combo52's profile picture

Hi Robert I would love to visit sometime and we hope you get a chance to come here also. I am basing my claims of superiority of US built dryers from my experience of repairing and selling laundry appliances for over 35 years here in the Washington D C area. This being an international city I have had quite a few opportunities to get my hands on European and other imported dryers over the years and in almost ever case I have ended up selling them for almost nothing , giving them away or usually just scraping them.

 

Whats different in a nutshell

1 they are only about 1/2 half the size in drum capacity [ not a enough room for loads of 10 pair of mens jeans or king size comforters].

2 They are seldom more than 3000 watts [ slow ]

3 Gas dryers are almost unheard of [ too large a carbon foot print from thier use ]

4 They are very difficult to work on [ not designed for longevity ]

5 They are often noisey

5 The blowers are not powerful enough to exhaust air through 15-30 feet of exhaust pipe without clogging quickly.

 

Almost all US dryers are also used in commercial applications, I would love to see how many of the European 24" machines are sold with a coin box on them.


Post# 517009 , Reply# 29   5/11/2011 at 08:35 (4,588 days old) by hoover1100 (U.K.)        
I would love to see how many of the European 24" machine

Asko and Miele are, off the top of my head...

 

My dryer can dry 8 pairs of jeans in an hour on LOW heat (high heat is far too hot on a 3kw dryer let alone a 5kw dryer! These are always 100% crease free and perfectly dried.

 

You can barely hear the dryer running unless you are basically next to it, the "noisy" dryers you are referring to must be the older (80s/90s) condenser models, modern condensers are no noisier than a vented model (provided you buy a half decent one).

 

As for them not being designed for longevity, well, I guess all the 50+ year old European models collectors on this forum have, as well as the many more still in daily use without repair must be a figment of our imaginations!

 

Perhaps in your opinion some Whirlpool designed dryers are 'the best', but that does not mean that 'U.S. dryers are superior to European dryers'.

 

Matt

 


Post# 517014 , Reply# 30   5/11/2011 at 08:46 (4,588 days old) by ozzie908 (Lincoln UK)        
US VS EUROPEAN DRYERS

ozzie908's profile picture
Having used the majority of dryers available in the UK including commercial gas ones I have for my personal use a Whirlpool dryer made in the USA its 240 13amp 3kw and is the best dryer ever it beats all uk ones including 7kg condenser its quick and due to its size is excellant at drying anything including king size duvets its only down side is its dimensions make it hard to fit in most kitchens luckily I have an unused airing cupboard that it fits in its exhausted through the roof. I hope I can always find space for it as I would hate to lose it now... and the best bit it was only 5.00 as it had a blown internal fuse.


Post# 517069 , Reply# 31   5/11/2011 at 13:41 (4,588 days old) by the7 ()        

Exhaust hood for GE dryer.

I checked the exhaust system of my GE dryer. It seems the weaker part is the original exhaust hood which was similar to the 2.5" as shown on the right-hand side of the table.

Now I have changed it to the 4" version as shown in the left-hand side.
The difference of exhaust length could be 5 to 10 ft in the over length.

It was in the border line case with the old hood. Now it is within the recommendation when using the new hood.

I notice that there is more air flow in the outlet of the new hood.




Post# 517075 , Reply# 32   5/11/2011 at 14:05 (4,588 days old) by the7 ()        

For this GE model.
a) The set-temperature of the Control Inlet Thermostat could be lower when its 9 Kohm is connected to the 120V.
b) The set-temperature of the Drum Outlet Thermostat could be also lower when its 9 Kohm is connected to the 120V.

A) When the Temperature Selector is NORMAL, both Control Inlet and Drum Outlet are HIGH.
B) When the Temperature Selector is PPress, Control Inlet is LOW and Drum Outlet is HIGH.
C)When the Temperature Selector is Delicate, both Control Inlet and Drum Outlet are LOW.


Post# 517109 , Reply# 33   5/11/2011 at 20:13 (4,587 days old) by the7 ()        
US VS EUROPEAN DRYERS

I would say that US dryers are optimally designed for NA market in terms of simplicity and easy of maintenance and low cost and relatively large capacity.

Post# 517218 , Reply# 34   5/12/2011 at 12:10 (4,587 days old) by the7 ()        

New 4" hood on the left.
Old 2.5" hood on the right.

New hood was installed to replace the old hood yesterday.
There is less restriction of air-flow using the new hood.

I will try to find out if there is any improvement in drying time.



Post# 517258 , Reply# 35   5/12/2011 at 17:09 (4,587 days old) by the7 ()        

Today a similar cotton/mixed load was used to test the dryer with the new hood.

A) From 0 to 10 min, the temp was increasing slowly from 66F to 117F (51F increase)

B) From 10 to 20 min, the temp was increasing very slowly from 117F to 122 (only 5F increase).

C) From 20 to 30 min, the temp was increasing slowly from 122F to 151F (29F increase).
During the periods of A, B and C, the inlet thermostat was switched ON/OFF one of the heating element to maintain the set-temperature of the inlet.

D) From 30 min to 45 min, the outlet thermostat took over to the set-temperature of the outlet. The outlet temp as measured varied from 133F to 154F. When the temp exceeded 154F, both heating elements were switched OFF. When the temp fell below 133F, both heating elements were switched ON.

E)From 45 min to 51 min (cooling down period) the outlet temp fell slowly to 102F and at 51 min the buzzer sounded to end the drying cycle

Note:
1) There is about 10% reduction in the drying cycle with the new hood.
2) But I think that there could be about 2 to 5% reduction in heating cost because the inlet temperature is maintained by the Control Inlet Thermostat.
3) The temperature variation at the outlet is about 3 deg F with the Control Inlet Thermostat in active mode.
4)The temperature variation at the outlet is about 20F (say 133F to 154F) with the Control Inlet Thermostat in active mode.


Post# 517259 , Reply# 36   5/12/2011 at 17:13 (4,587 days old) by the7 ()        

XXX 4)The temperature variation at the outlet is about 20F (say 133F to 154F) with the Control Inlet Thermostat in active mode. XXX

should read

4)The temperature variation at the outlet is about 20F (say 133F to 154F) with the Drum Outlet Thermostat in active mode.


Post# 517273 , Reply# 37   5/12/2011 at 18:50 (4,587 days old) by combo52 (50 Year Repair Tech Beltsville,Md)        
NEW GE ELECTRIC DRYER

combo52's profile picture

How long is your vent system and how many elbows are in it? The cycling of one heater so early in the drying cycle does not seem correct. This is one of the major reasons that I have never liked dryers that have the heater elements right behind or right in front of the dryers drum. GE is cycling one heater with the inlet thermostat to keep the rear drum temperature lower to prevent scorching clothing and dryer fires. It would be interesting to try drying a load with the vent disconnected and see if the one heater cycles so early in the drying cycle.

 

Only GE and Frigidare still put the heaters so close to the clothes load and as a result they have to use very sensitive thromostats to prevent the above mentioned problems with clothing damage and fires. Too make matters worse both GE and Frigidare dryers have small lint filters and if you are drying a very linty load it can get quite restricted during one load.

 

MT discontinued this poor placement of the heater element in 1976 when they finely discontinued the HOH dryer and Frigidare got rid of this problem when they introduced the 1-18 dryers in 1970. Even European dryers separate the heater element from the clothes by placing it in a metal box away from the drum. The heater element in an electric dryer easily hits 1600 degrees or more hotter than the flame in a gas dryer.

 

On a full sized WP built electric dryer the heater will not cycle even once until the exhaust or blower housing thermostat is satisfied. This is one of the many problems with Consumer Reports as they rate these GE dryers highly but they are tested under perfect conditions, they even rated the worst dryer on the market in north America the Frigidare as a best buy a few years ago. Thier engineers should come on service calls with me for one week and see all the burned up heaters and rear drum bearings in GE and Frigidare dryers that we see.


Post# 517277 , Reply# 38   5/12/2011 at 19:19 (4,586 days old) by the7 ()        

How long is your vent system and how many elbows are in it?

The length of the flexible aluminum is about 3ft.
I estimated the length of the rigid metal is about 8 ft.
The effective no of elbows could be 4.

This seems to be within the recommendation for the GE dryer.








Post# 517301 , Reply# 39   5/12/2011 at 21:26 (4,586 days old) by the7 ()        

combo52 says:
"Only GE and Frigidare still put the heaters so close to the clothes load and as a result they have to use very sensitive thromostats to prevent the above mentioned problems with clothing damage and fires.

Even European dryers separate the heater element from the clothes by placing it in a metal box away from the drum."

I would think your observations are right.
1) GE should put the electrical heating elements inside a metal box similar to the heating chamber of its gas version.
2)It is also preferable to have a control inlet thermostat in addition to the safety over-temperature thermostat at the inlet such the inlet air temperature could be maintained at an optimal temperature even before the outlet temperature reaches the outlet set-temperature.
3) I think that the newer version of the 29" WP has such control inlet thermostat for the model with Normal/PP/Delicate selection.






Post# 517399 , Reply# 40   5/13/2011 at 09:01 (4,586 days old) by the7 ()        

combo52 says:
"On a full sized WP built electric dryer the heater will not cycle even once until the exhaust or blower housing thermostat is satisfied."

Most 29" WP uses "High-limit Thermostat of 250 deg F and Thermal Fuse of 360 deg F" at the inlet. The high-limit may not have a chance to cut-off the heating power because the inlet air temperature does not reach 250 deg during the heating up . The "Thermal Fuse of 360 deg" is for extra safety cut-off and non-settable.


The GE uses two thermostats at the inlet - Safety Thermostat and Control Inlet Thermostat.
I would think that
a) the Safety Thermostat would work at a temperature close to the "High-limit Thermostat of 250 deg F" and
b) the Control Inlet Thermostat would work at a temperature lower than that of the Safety Thermostat (say 20 to 50 deg lower). It is designed to maintain a regulated inlet air temperature. It has two inlet set-temperatures for this model with Normal/PP/Delicate. With a lower inlet temperature, it would take a longer time to reach the target temperature at the outlet.

I think that there are also two inlet set-temperatures in some new 29" WP dryer model with Normal/PP/Delicate(Gentle Breeze model?).


Post# 517467 , Reply# 41   5/13/2011 at 13:32 (4,586 days old) by the7 ()        

Looking at the data from the GE circuit diagram:

a) The inlet temperature of the GE is maintained from 180F to 210F by the Control Inlet Thermostat and the Safety Left Thermostat
b) The Thermo Hi-Limit Right Thermostat will shut down the whole dryer if the inlet temperature exceeds 250F when all the other thermostats fail to work.

Thus it seems that the GE dryer is working at a lower inlet temperature than the 29" WP dryer. This could be the reason why the WP does not cycle the heater until the target temperature at the drum outlet is reached.


Post# 517534 , Reply# 42   5/13/2011 at 18:24 (4,586 days old) by combo52 (50 Year Repair Tech Beltsville,Md)        
WP 29" & 27" ELECTRIC DRYERS

combo52's profile picture

Most WP 29" and all 27" dryers do not tapper the inlet heat entering the drum, however some electronically controlled 29" dryers have dual heaters and some also have a thermistor on the heater box that controls the inlet temperature for  low temperature loads and to save a small amount of energy on certain control settings.

 

The inlet temperature can be far higher on a WP or other stationary bulk head dryers because the clothing is never in constant contact with the inlet area. The clothing is always quickly passing the inlet. On revolving back dryer drums, including the European models with a separate box the entire rear of the drum can get very hot. This is more likely to happen when the load is very large, the exhaust is too long or otherwise restricted or when very linty items are being dried and the filter clogs during the cycle.


Post# 517600 , Reply# 43   5/14/2011 at 01:04 (4,585 days old) by the7 ()        

Thanks combo52 for the valuable info from your experience.

Post# 518299 , Reply# 44   5/16/2011 at 16:14 (4,583 days old) by the7 ()        

Further findings for the GE dryer:

a) NORMAL Temperature:
The temperature at the drum outlet varies from 133F to 154F when the target temperature is reached.
The Control Inlet temperature would be maintained within a limit (say 180F to 210F)


b) PPress Temperature:
The temperature at the drum outlet is same as that of the NORMAL.
However the Control Inlet temperature limit will be lower than that of the NORMAL (say could be 10 to 20F lower).


c) Delicate Temperature:
The temperature at the drum outlet varies from 122F to 147F when the target temperature is reached.
The Control Inlet temperature limit is same as that of the PPress.


I will use the PPress Temperature most of time because the clothing seems to be softer with a lower inlet temperature .



Post# 519089 , Reply# 45   5/19/2011 at 14:23 (4,580 days old) by the7 ()        

I used the PPress Temp to dry a load of cotton/mixed this morning. It took about 3 to 5% longer to reach the target temperature at the drum outlet. It seems that the dryness and condition of the clothing is quite similar to that using the NORMAL Temp.

I think that there is practically no difference in energy usage. Perhaps it is better for the clothing (especially for Cotton/PP mixed load) using lower inlet heating temperature.



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