Thread Number: 79702  /  Tag: Ranges, Stoves, Ovens
Better Because it's Gas, Best Because it's a Caloric! Part One
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Post# 1035900   6/21/2019 at 07:00 by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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Another thread that is being rebuilt due almost to complete image loss and for the archives. This one will take some time to reconstitute due to it's size. Sadly, most of the comments will be lost since it would be far too time consuming to repost each and every one. When the rebuilding is complete, I will post the latest updates of the Ultramatic.

 

Many thanks to John, Martin, Mark, Steve, Bill and everyone else for their help, advice and encouragement on this project.

 

 

 

So let's take a step back in time shall we?

 

 




This post was last edited 06/21/2019 at 08:14



Post# 1035902 , Reply# 1   6/21/2019 at 07:14 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted on 3/27/2014

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My 1964 Caloric Ultramatic Heritage Series has finally arrived to it's new home in Brooklyn.

36 inches of good 'ole American iron. All porcelain inside and out. With rotisserie, Ultra-Ray broiler, 2nd  broiler, Automatic Cooking Control, Fowl and Roast Selector, meat probe, griddle, 5th burner, two automatic burners, clock/timer, panel light/oven light, Oven Ready light, Automatic Cooking Completed light.

 

After a quick wipe down.

 

1964 Caloric Ultramatic Heratige Series Range

 

The control panel reminds me of the Jupiter 2's flight deck from Lost In Space.

The fluorescent panel light works, but flickers badly.

 

 


Post# 1035904 , Reply# 2   6/21/2019 at 07:40 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted on 3/27/2014

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Porcelain drip bowls:

 

With porcelain drip bowls.

 

Chrome drip bowls (from a 1965 Ultramatic) and aluminum griddle:

 

Stainless drip bowls and aluminum griddle

 

And under the griddle, a fifth burner (Burner-with-a-Brain).

 

5th Burner (Burner with a Brain)

 

 

 

 

 


Post# 1035908 , Reply# 3   6/21/2019 at 08:02 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted on 3/27/2014

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Let there be light!

 

Control panel light bulb replaced.

 

 

 

The Caloric will receive a thorough cleaning and repair.


Post# 1035910 , Reply# 4   6/21/2019 at 08:25 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted on 2/5/2014 by Fjg1973

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1962 Caloric Ultramatic

I have the same stove but a different model that came with my house when I bought the house in 1989. I actually built my new kitchen around that stove because it's built so well. My model has the Caloric and Ultramatic on the glass and the panel below the glass is coppertone and black paint. My model does not have the middle grill or the meat probe. I guess it's the model just below yours. The Ultra Ray high broiler and is the best. The top Burners boil water really fast. What's amazing is the whole stove is porcelain including the back and feet. I do need parts so if you know of a place where I can get any, please let me know.

 

 


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Post# 1035911 , Reply# 5   6/21/2019 at 08:27 by Tomturbomatic (Beltsville, MD)        

Louis, are the porcelain bowls separate pieces from the top and removable for cleaning, like the chrome bowls?


Post# 1035912 , Reply# 6   6/21/2019 at 08:28 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted on 4/7/2014 by fjg 1973

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1962 Caloric Ultramatic

Hi Louie, here are the pictures of the rotisserie rod spit assembly.

 


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Post# 1035913 , Reply# 7   6/21/2019 at 08:30 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted on 4/7/2014 by fjg 1973

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1962 Caloric Ultramatic

Some other ones where you slide the assembly into the Ultra Ray High Broiler you have to use the last grove so that the spit will meet the electric motor so that it can turn.


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Post# 1035914 , Reply# 8   6/21/2019 at 08:34 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted on 4/7/2014 by fjg 1973

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1962 Caloric Ultramatic

Here is the switch I use to turn on the electric with the panel light on. Look all the way to the right where the red oven switch is there is a hole where the actual green panel switch should be but I took it out.

 

 


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Post# 1035915 , Reply# 9   6/21/2019 at 08:36 by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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Yes Tom, all the bowls are removable. The porcelain bowls are not easy to keep clean though. I use a lot of Easy-Off to keep them sparkling.


Post# 1035916 , Reply# 10   6/21/2019 at 08:53 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/7/2014

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Electric disconnect block. "It allows the top of the range and control panel to be disconnected from the body of the range." (John, Combo52).

 

Electric disconect block


Post# 1035918 , Reply# 11   6/21/2019 at 09:00 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted on 4/7/2014

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Top removed. Beginning to clean up nicely. Very little rust.

 

Cleaning under the top.

 

 


Post# 1035919 , Reply# 12   6/21/2019 at 09:02 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/7/2014

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Oven shut off valve:

 

Gas shut off valve for oven


Post# 1035920 , Reply# 13   6/21/2019 at 09:08 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/7/2014

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5th burner support (Burner-with-a-Brain):

 

5th burner support


Post# 1035921 , Reply# 14   6/21/2019 at 09:12 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/7/2014

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Front right burner support (Burner-with-a-Brain)

 

Front right burner support (Burner-With-A-Brain)


Post# 1035928 , Reply# 15   6/21/2019 at 09:41 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted on 9/8/2014

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Well the cleaning is done. Control panel removal is next.

 

All clean

 

And the rear came out spiffy too.

 

Rear

 


Post# 1035931 , Reply# 16   6/21/2019 at 09:47 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/8/2014

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I got the control panel off, and degreasing the cook top.  The aluminum grill/vent is another story.

 

Top removed. Soaking in Easy-Off.


Post# 1035932 , Reply# 17   6/21/2019 at 09:51 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/8/2014

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SOB screws holding the grill/vent to the cook top are proving to be hell to remove. Got one off, two snapped where the nut was. and the last the head is getting stripped. Yes, they were soaked overnight with WD-40, got another spray a few moments before I attempted to remove them. I can't chisel them off because of the porcelain. So I'm gonna' have to drill them out. I really need to get a Dremel.

 

Corroded bolts holding grill to cook top.


Post# 1035933 , Reply# 18   6/21/2019 at 09:53 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/9/2014

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And now the control panel:

 

Control panel


Post# 1035934 , Reply# 19   6/21/2019 at 09:56 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/9/2014

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Gauges:

 

Gauges


Post# 1035935 , Reply# 20   6/21/2019 at 10:01 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/9/2014

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Glass removed. As you can see, a lot of dirt and grease has accumulated through the years. Everything is metal, no plastic anywhere. What a shame we can't get this quality anymore.

 

Glass removed.


Post# 1035936 , Reply# 21   6/21/2019 at 10:03 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/9/2014

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If there is one thing I can't stand, it's a dead clock. Let's see what's wrong here.

 

Dead clock/timer


Post# 1035937 , Reply# 22   6/21/2019 at 10:15 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/10/2014

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Clock/timer motor only hums, does not run.

 

Clock/timer electric motor

 

Clock/timer motor

 

Clock/timer motor

 

Clock/timer motor

 

 


Post# 1035938 , Reply# 23   6/21/2019 at 10:19 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/11/2014 by rp2813

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"1)  Remove the rotor from the coil assembly.  You can probably push it out, or loosen the screws on either side of the coil to help free it.

 

2)  Place (balance) the rotor, pinion gear side up, on top of a light bulb (60 to 100W) and try to get the rotor as level as possible.

 

3)  Turn on the light and let the rotor cook for at least 30 minutes.  When time is up, shut off the lamp, leave rotor in place, and apply a drop or two of oil onto the pinion gear.  You should see it fill the small well around the gear's base, and then slowly (or sometimes quickly) be absorbed into the rotor case.  Repeat this until you've added 15 - 20 drops of oil.  If it stops drawing it in, heat the rotor up again and then pick up where you left off.

 

4)  Install the rotor back into the coil assembly, connect to power, being careful not to disturb the soldered connections on the coil.  Check gear for rotation.  Information on the rotor case should indicate the rotor runs at 3.6 RPM.  I sort of eyeball it and check against a clock with a sweep second hand.

 

If the rotor is noisy, you may want to heat it up once more and add maybe 5 or 10 more drops of oil.  Less is more.  Too much oil and it will bog down the mechanism inside the rotor and cause it to run too slow.  Noisy rotors that have been revived can sometimes quiet down once they're back in use for a while too. "

 

 




This post was last edited 06/21/2019 at 12:27
Post# 1035939 , Reply# 24   6/21/2019 at 10:22 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/11/2014

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I had to use a big, heavy nut to balance it. Using a 75 watt bulb.

 

Clock/Timer motor revival


Post# 1035940 , Reply# 25   6/21/2019 at 10:23 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/11/2014

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OK, I've added 20 drops of 3n1 (blue can). It sucked it up readily. I carefully turned the gear with a pair of needle nose pliers. It rotates! Before it was dead jammed. Now lets see when I apply current.


Post# 1035942 , Reply# 26   6/21/2019 at 10:30 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/11/2014

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Success!!! It rotates!

 

 


Post# 1035943 , Reply# 27   6/21/2019 at 10:37 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/11/2014

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I need a knob...I need another one like this for the clock.

 

Clock/Timer knob

 

Clock/Timer knob

 

Clock/Timer knob


Post# 1035944 , Reply# 28   6/21/2019 at 10:39 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/12/2014

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When it rains it pours. The tab snapped off the winding wire of the clock/timer. The worst case scenario. I already found a replacement coil but it's quite pricey.


Post# 1035946 , Reply# 29   6/21/2019 at 10:42 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/12/2014 by wiskybill

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Louis...

I found this in my "parts" box.

If you think it may work I'll gladly send it to you.

Bill

 

 


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Post# 1035947 , Reply# 30   6/21/2019 at 10:43 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/12/2014

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Bill, thank you for your very kind offer, it actually looks like what you have may work. Let me try and repair the one that I have and see. If it doesn't pan out, I'll take you up on it. Thank you once again! XO!


Post# 1035948 , Reply# 31   6/21/2019 at 10:45 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/13/2014 by wiskybill

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Ralph...

This question is for you.

First, I will admit that I don't know all of the technical points
to a Telechron motor.

I was looking for info and found that while the S and H rotors are different,
the coils are dimensionally the same. The difference being that the H coils
have the leads on the body of the coil and the S coils have the leads on the
end of the coil.

Is there anything I'm missing? Do you think this may work for Louis if
he can't repair the coil he has?

 

 


  View Full Size
Post# 1035949 , Reply# 32   6/21/2019 at 10:46 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/13/2014 by rp2813

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Bill,  I'm pretty sure the coil and rotor assembly for an S type rotor isn't an exact match for an H type.  The S rotor is larger at the end that fits into the coil and smaller on the side with the pinion gear, so for sure the S type coil won't accommodate an H rotor and vice-versa.  Additionally, due to the size difference in the rotors, it may not be possible to do a complete change-out of an H type coil assembly for an S type. 

 

Other factors could be the pinion gear RPM and the size and number of cogs on the pinion gear itself.

 

The field coil alone could probably work, but since it's riveted in place on your coil assembly, it can't be removed.

 

FYI, the numbers stamped on the field coil wrapper indicate the number of windings X 1,000 (I think).  The fact that yours has 68K and Louie's has 60K wouldn't be an issue.  Louie's might get slightly warmer during operation, though.  This gives you a sense for just how thin the winding wires are.


Post# 1035951 , Reply# 33   6/21/2019 at 10:47 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/13/2014 by wiskybill

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Plan B...

I knew I had another one hiding somewhere and I
finally found it.

It's your Louis, if you want it.

 

 


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Post# 1035954 , Reply# 34   6/21/2019 at 10:50 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/13/2014 by wiskybill

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The rotor assembly is a H3 3.6RPM and it fits in
both coil frames. The coil is held with screws in the H frame.
The coil is marked 70.


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Post# 1035955 , Reply# 35   6/21/2019 at 10:51 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/14/2014

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Bill you're the BEST! Thank you!


Post# 1035956 , Reply# 36   6/21/2019 at 10:52 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/14/2014 by wiskybill

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Louis..

Glad I could help.

The stove just wouldn't be complete without a working clock!


Post# 1035957 , Reply# 37   6/21/2019 at 10:52 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/15/2014

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I know! I can't wait to see it working again! Thanks again Bill!


Post# 1035958 , Reply# 38   6/21/2019 at 10:58 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/20/2014

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Thanks to Bill (wiskybill) who was kind enough to send me not one, but TWO rotors  and coils, the clock is now functioning perfectly.

 

Replacement Clock/Timer motor


Post# 1035959 , Reply# 39   6/21/2019 at 10:59 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 9/21/2014

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Running smooth and quiet.

 





Post# 1035960 , Reply# 40   6/21/2019 at 11:29 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 3/18/2015

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Grease was so thick I had to use a razor blade.

 

Control panel glass before.

 

The new vinyl pin-striping was a perfect match.

 

Control panel glass, after.

 

Control panel glass, after.

 

Control panel glass, after.

 

Control panel glass, after.

 

 


Post# 1035961 , Reply# 41   6/21/2019 at 11:35 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted on 3/18/2014

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The "Automatic Cooking Control" module was replaced as I suspected. Looks like the replacement cost $19.50.

 

Automatic Cooking Control

 

Automatic Cooking Control


Post# 1035962 , Reply# 42   6/21/2019 at 11:44 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 3/19/2015

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The red is an "Automatic Cooking Complete" indicator light, the white one is the "Oven Ready" light.  They both work. Eventually they will burn out. Do you replace the entire unit? Or can you replace only the bulb?

 

Neon, control panel indicator lights.


Post# 1035963 , Reply# 43   6/21/2019 at 11:45 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 3/19/2015 by combo52

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These have little neon bulbs in them and a power dropping resistor in them, they are very long lived only draw about 1/3 of a watt and you do replace the whole thing when it fails. I would use the originals if they work, these lights are probably the last things you need to worry about when it comes to keeping this range functioning.


Post# 1035964 , Reply# 44   6/21/2019 at 11:46 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 3/19/2015

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Wow neon, who new? Thanks John.


Post# 1035965 , Reply# 45   6/21/2019 at 11:54 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 3/20/2015

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I painted the lettering and added a stripe to the control panel. The stripe and the red, white and blue hexagons were featured on some Ultramatics' from 1962. I'm not sure if it was available for '63 or '64. Never seen a '64 with them. So I decided to add them. The stripe is easy enough. I did a test painting the white hexagon with a paint pen. I'm not too sure what was used, paint, contact paper or plastic. The red and white colors are easy to find, but the turquoise not so easy. It has to be a very pale hue, not unlike the color of the panel light knob.

 

Control panel white paint pen test.

 

Control panel repainted lettering and pinstriping.

 

 


Post# 1035967 , Reply# 46   6/21/2019 at 12:04 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted on 3/29/2014

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As it turned out, the colored hexagons were available for 1964, so I'm good to go. After a lot of searching, I found a very close match to the  turquoise  on the panel light control knob.

 

Control panel repainting and pinstriping.

 

Control panel completed.


Post# 1035968 , Reply# 47   6/21/2019 at 12:13 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 3/30/2015

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Well I found out the model #, It's 54856"A".

 

May, 1964?

 

Wiring schematic.

 

 

 

 

 


Post# 1035991 , Reply# 48   6/21/2019 at 17:25 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 3/30/2015

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Glass light lens disassembly.

The grease and grime never ends...sigh.

 

Control panel light assembly.

 

Control panel light lens disassembly.

 

Control panel light lens disassembly.

 

Control panel light lens disassembly.

 

Control panel light lens disassembly.

 

Control panel light lens disassembly.

 

Control panel light lens disassembly.

 

 

After cleaning.

 

Control panel light lens after cleaning.

 

Control panel light lens after cleaning.

 

 

Control panel reassembled.

 

Control panel assembled.

 

Control panel reassembled.

 

Control panel assembled.

 

 

 

 


Post# 1035993 , Reply# 49   6/21/2019 at 17:54 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 3/31/2015

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Rinsing the grease...

 

Rinsing grease off top.

 

Looking spiffy!

 

Reinstalled top

 

Exhaust grill after degreasing, prior to painting.

 

Exhaust grill after cleaning, prior to painting

 

Exhaust grill after degreasing and before repainting.

 

After painting with correct semi-matte paint.

 

Exhaust grill after painting.

 

Exhaust grill after painting.


Post# 1035994 , Reply# 50   6/21/2019 at 18:02 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/5/2015

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The Caloric crest before cleaning.

 

Caloric crest prior to cleaning.

 

 

And after.

 

Caloric crest after cleaning.

 

 


Post# 1035995 , Reply# 51   6/21/2019 at 18:06 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted on 4/6/2015

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Getting there.

 

Getting there.

 

 

The meat probe outlet. So far, haven't seen any meat probes that could plug in here. Pardon the Easy-Off.

 

Oven meat probe plug.

 

 


Post# 1035996 , Reply# 52   6/21/2019 at 18:28 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/7/2015

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Ultra-ray broiler and oven.

 

Ultra-ray broiler and oven

 

The oven.

 

Oven

 

Oven

 

The Ultra-ray broiler.

 

Ultra-ray broiler

 

Disassembly and servicing of rotisserie motor.

 

Disassembly of rotisserie motor.

 

Rotisserie motor

 

Rotisserie motor.

 

Rotisserie motor

 

 

Robust construction. Clean inside, all gears and motor turn smoothly. Will lube the shaft for good measure.

 

Rotisserie motor.

 

 

Reinstalled.

 

Rotisserie motor

 

 

 

 

 

 


Post# 1035997 , Reply# 53   6/21/2019 at 18:33 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/8/2015

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Some cleaning, a few drops of oil and it works just fine! Ignore the first 16 seconds. Used a flat screw driver instead of a phillips. (I need a good nights sleep).

 





Post# 1035999 , Reply# 54   6/21/2019 at 18:48 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/8/2015

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I had to remove the Ultra-Ray broiler. The mounting bracket (top center) for the pilot light got bent during transit from Beltsville. So I had to straighten it out.

 

Ultra-ray broiler

 

The fine mesh of the Ultra-Ray is extremely fragile. Just a light touch from my finger and it started to crumble (lower right). I hope this doesn't effect it's performance.

 

Ultra-ray broiler.

 

 

Zinc oven floor reinstalled after cleaning.

 

Oven zinc floor reinstalled.

 

 

 

The Ultra-ray is all clean.

 

Ultra-ray

 

Rotisserie rack.

 

Rotisserie rack

 

 

Mystery plate in Ultra-ray oven. Perhaps for heater option?

 

Mystery plate in Ultra-ray oven.

 

Conventional broiler all done.

 

Conventional broiler completed.

 

 

Oven done.

 

Completed oven.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Post# 1036002 , Reply# 55   6/21/2019 at 19:04 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/9/2015 by toploader55

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Old Restaurant Trick for Oven Racks...


Place the Racks in a Large Trash Bag being careful not to poke any holes in the bag.

 

Then pour in 1 Cup of Ammonia and seal the bag up tightly.

 

Leave over night.  The next day remove the racks and the carbon and grease flakes off. Guaranteed.


Post# 1036003 , Reply# 56   6/21/2019 at 19:05 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/9/2015

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What a great idea Eddie! I will definitely try that when they get dirty again.


Post# 1036004 , Reply# 57   6/21/2019 at 19:11 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/11/2015

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Because the gas shut off valve is unreachable once the stove is in place,  I decided to add a shut off valve inside the stove. If anything were ever go south, the valve would be readily reachable.

 

New, internal main gas shut off valve


Post# 1036006 , Reply# 58   6/21/2019 at 19:49 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 11/11/2015

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The wiring in the rear developed a short, until I realized I was reading the electrical schismatic backwards. What a rats nest!

 

Control panel wiring.

 

Control panel wiring.

 

Control panel wiring.

 

Control panel wiring.

 

 


Post# 1036008 , Reply# 59   6/21/2019 at 20:02 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 12/2/2015

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The fifth burner's pilot light does not work. My dad says it's just clogged. No gas smell. The oven, has a pilot light, but the burner won't catch on. When the oven is switched on, the pilot light increases in size, and a rod starts to glow, but that's it.  The oven won't light.

 

Oven pilot light.

 

Oven pilot light.

 





Post# 1036009 , Reply# 60   6/21/2019 at 20:11 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 12/3/2015

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The fifth burner is operational again. Turned out , the set screw was turn all the way "off". I suppose the prior owners wanted to save gas and turned it off. In addition, the burner was clogged.

 

 


Post# 1036010 , Reply# 61   6/21/2019 at 20:13 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 12/3/2015 by toploader55

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Hi Louis.

 

The Safety Pilot Assembly is called a Thermo Couple.

 

This looks familiar as it happens in the restaurant on Fryers, Ovens when the Thermo Couple goes bad.

 

There should be easy to replace.


Post# 1036011 , Reply# 62   6/21/2019 at 20:15 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 12/3/2015

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

It is indeed the thermocouple. I will switch it out on Saturday.

 

A quick observation. Now that all 5 pilot lights are lit, the stove's top sure is warm, hell, hot in some areas.

 

Oh yeah, one more thing, did I mention the Ultra-Ray broiler works beautifully? laughing


Post# 1036012 , Reply# 63   6/21/2019 at 20:18 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 12/6/2015 by combo52

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Hi Everyone, I am thrilled to see you getting this range up and working, a few points

 

This range DOES NOT HAVE a thermocouple, almost no home gas ranges used TCs after about 1961. The part shown in reply #115 is not used any where on this [ or any home gas range after about 1961 ] Range.

 

Hans is correct, you need a complete oven safety valve. [ note these oven safety valves contain mercury, dispose of the old one at a facility that recycles mercury ]

 

All the top burner pilots should be turned down as low as possible to not only save gas but to also reduce the extensive damage that the combustion byproducts from these small inefficient burning flames will do to the underside of the range top and everything else under the cook-top. I would differently consider keeping the center pilot turned off like our former customer did.

 

Can't wait to see some of the great cooking that this range is going to do, the Ultra-Ray broiler rotisserie would be my favorite feature for sure.

 

John L.


Post# 1036013 , Reply# 64   6/21/2019 at 20:20 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 12/6/2015

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Thanks for the info John. Well this seems it's going to be a costly repair. But it's the price for being MCM. All the pilots are quite tiny. I figure my carbon footprint is far smaller than most, so they're gonna stay lit. Besides, what's the purpose of being modern if you have to light a burner with a match? tongue-out


Post# 1036015 , Reply# 65   6/21/2019 at 20:28 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 12/23/2015 by combo52

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Burner with a brain operation

 

On these burners you set the flame size then turn the dial back to the temperature you want to maintain. The flame should go on and off completely as the temperature is reached. There is a standby pilot next to the burner that comes on when you start the burner that will relight the burner when it comes on again.

Other than having to clean out the standby pilot orifice I have almost never seen one of the gas burner with a brain doesn't work beautifully.

 

 


Post# 1036036 , Reply# 66   6/22/2019 at 07:32 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 1/4/2016 by combo52

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Coloric Range--Proper Oven Operation

 

Hi Louie, and a BIG Happy New Year to You, it is neat to see you getting this cool old range restored after it sat in my shop all those years.

 

The oven pilot looks fine when it comes on and it is heating the oven safety valves properly, so as discussed before you very likely need a need oven safety valve [ the one other possibly is the oven thromostat is not opening the main gas flow to the oven safety valve when you first turn the oven on, this can be tested by loosening the big gas line coming into the SV and then briefly turn on the oven thromostat and you should have a strong flow of gas, blow out the oven pilot while doing this ].

 

The other problem you seem to be having is the pre-heat pilot flame should stay on at any thermostat setting until the oven temperature is up to that setting and then it turns off the larger pilet pre-heat gas flow then the red hot SV bulb cools and shuts off the main gas burner till more heat is needed. So you have a thromostat problem as well, it may not be serious but at the least it needs to be dissembled and cleaned or rebuilt.


Post# 1036037 , Reply# 67   6/22/2019 at 07:33 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 1/5/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

 

Thanks!

 

Happy New Year John! Would you happen to know where I can find the part number of the safety valve?


Post# 1036038 , Reply# 68   6/22/2019 at 07:40 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/11/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Another piece for the puzzle. I found a lot of panel knobs for the Caloric. I only needed the clock knob, but what the hell, they came as a set. Never can have too many knobs I say.

 

Extra Knob set.

 


Post# 1036039 , Reply# 69   6/22/2019 at 07:42 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/11/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Safety Valve

 

I heard back from my local source. They do have a rebuilt safety valve, $160 with my old one, $200 with out, OUCH.

 

I had no idea you could rebuild safety valves.


Post# 1036040 , Reply# 70   6/22/2019 at 07:55 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/11/2016 by combo52

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Oven safety valves

 

Can be rebuilt but as you found out it's a little bit expensive and not a do-it-yourself project to rebuild it at least.

 

Glad you're staying with this project can't wait to hear how you like it once it's fully functional yay.


Post# 1036041 , Reply# 71   6/22/2019 at 07:58 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/11/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Thanks John.

 

So, in order to remove the safety valve, it's just some screws and a compression ring of sorts? Or it it much more involved?


Post# 1036042 , Reply# 72   6/22/2019 at 07:59 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/11/2016 by combo52

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Oven safety valve,

 

Is the part that the big gas line connects to before the gas goes into the cast iron burner, it also has a tiny flexible SS line that goes up to the pilot assembly and is heated by the enlarged pilot flame that occurs when you turn the oven on to open and allow gas to flow to the main burner.


Post# 1036043 , Reply# 73   6/22/2019 at 08:04 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/14/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

 

John, is this what you were referring to?

 

Oven safety valve.


Post# 1036044 , Reply# 74   6/22/2019 at 08:05 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/11/2016 by combo52

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Yes.


Post# 1036045 , Reply# 75   6/22/2019 at 08:06 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/14/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Thanks John. Seems simple enough to remove.


Post# 1036047 , Reply# 76   6/22/2019 at 08:11 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/18/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

The safety valve, piece of cake to remove. I am getting the rebuilt one today.

 

Original oven safety valve.

 

Original oven safty valve.

 

Original oven safety valve.

 

Mounting for oven safety valve.


Post# 1036049 , Reply# 77   6/22/2019 at 08:19 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/18/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

I decided to buy a brand new safety valve instead of a rebuilt one. Literature that came with it read "1971".

 

New, oven safety valve.


Post# 1036052 , Reply# 78   6/22/2019 at 08:24 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/18/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

But there is a problem (isn't there always?), The sensor bulb is shorter on the new valve than on the old one. They both have a "stop" that only lets them go a certain amount into the pilot light assembly.

 

Old and new sensor bulbs.


Post# 1036053 , Reply# 79   6/22/2019 at 08:26 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/18/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

My solution is to drill out the hole in the pilot light assembly so the new sensor bulb "stop" could go through. There is a screw to tighten the bulb to the assembly.

 

Adapting to accept new sensor bulb.


Post# 1036054 , Reply# 80   6/22/2019 at 08:28 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/19/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Well I drilled, and installed it. Hooked all the connections and NOTHING. The pilot light won't light. No gas is coming out of the safety valve. No gas smell, no leaks. I rechecked the connections, everything seems OK. What am I missing?


Post# 1036055 , Reply# 81   6/22/2019 at 08:36 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/19/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Then...

 

We have IGNITION!

 

Oven burner.

 

Ultra-ray broiler.

 

All 5 burners.


Post# 1036056 , Reply# 82   6/22/2019 at 08:37 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/19/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

I think it was air in the gas line. I ignited the oven directly with a match, the pilot light caught on, and now the oven works perfectly.


Post# 1036057 , Reply# 83   6/22/2019 at 08:38 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/19/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Now a couple of minor things and I'm finally done. A new switch for the oven light, the rotisserie spit rod and here's a strange one, when you turn the oven on, the panel light turns on, when you turn the oven off, the light goes off. The switch for the panel light works fine.  WTF?


Post# 1036058 , Reply# 84   6/22/2019 at 08:39 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/19/2016 by combo52

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Coloric Range

 

YAY Louie, you got it working, yes drilling out the plate was the right thing to do.

 

I would guess that the control panel light comes on to remind you that the oven is in use, many hi-end electric ranges did thing like this.

 

Now You're  COOKING.


Post# 1036059 , Reply# 85   6/22/2019 at 08:41 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/19/2016 by turquoisedude

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Rotisserie spit rod

 

Louie, I have a couple of spares in my oven parts box.  I'll try to remember to photograph what I've got this weekend and post here.   Does the Ultramatic range use a rack like an oven rack to support a spit??


Post# 1036060 , Reply# 86   6/22/2019 at 08:42 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/19/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Thanks John. The panel light really freaked me out. I thought God, to go through all that wiring again! LOL!  I knew electric stoves had an indicator light for the oven, never thought a gas one would have it. That's one hell of an indicator light!


Post# 1036061 , Reply# 87   6/22/2019 at 08:48 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/19/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Thanks Paul, I'd appreciate it. Yes, it does use an oven support rack. Here's some pic's sent to me by Fred (flg1973):

 

Rotiserrie rack with spit rod.

 

Rotisserie support rack and spit rod.


Post# 1036062 , Reply# 88   6/22/2019 at 08:53 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/19/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

I tried to see how accurate the thermostat was, set it slightly higher than 350F, thermometer read around 360F, which is not bad. I read somewhere that the actual oven temperature never matches exactly what the thermostat was set to.

 

Oven dial

 

Oven thermometer.


Post# 1036063 , Reply# 89   6/22/2019 at 08:56 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/20/2016 by jamiel

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

What was the "keep warm" setting on the dial? I know it was a AGA (American Gas Association) innovation along with the "burner with a brain" to better compete with electricity, but I've never had an old enough gas stove to have it on the dial.


Post# 1036064 , Reply# 90   6/22/2019 at 08:57 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/20/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Exactly that, in order to compete with the ultra low settings on electrics, gas stove manufacturers came up with a similar setting. After cooking a meal, this setting is to keep it warm until serving.


Post# 1036065 , Reply# 91   6/22/2019 at 09:00 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/20/2016 by combo52

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Low temp gas oven thermostat

 

These came about around 1961 to compete with electric ovens that had no trouble maintaining a low temperature to keep food warm etc.

The problem with them was the flame had to cycle on and off to maintain a temperature and once they did this gas ovens no longer baked well. Electric ovens worked OK with the heat cycling on and off because they were much better insulated and enclosed on the bottom and didn't have a huge event on the top letting the eat pour out.


Post# 1036066 , Reply# 92   6/22/2019 at 09:01 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/20/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Thanks John for the info.


Post# 1036067 , Reply# 93   6/22/2019 at 09:03 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/21/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

I removed the defective oven light switch last night. So far I have not been able to find a replacement. The problem is the long shank. I have another source, on Canal street (nightmare to park there). Keep your fingers crossed.

 

Original oven light switch.


Post# 1036068 , Reply# 94   6/22/2019 at 09:05 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/21/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

The oven light switch is proving to be a PIA to find. Went to half a dozen places today, and no dice. They all have the same one with a short, thick shank. Online is not much better.

 

On a brighter note, I may have found a source for the rotisserie spit rod.  It would be new, but damn close to the original. Need to do a few measurements to be sure.


Post# 1036069 , Reply# 95   6/22/2019 at 09:08 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/25/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

I've noticed the knobs are beginning to scratch the porcelain behind them. The valves are too deep so the knobs are rubbing up against the stove with every turn. Now correct me if I'm wrong, but weren't there plastic spacers available to correct this?

 

Stove knobs.

 

Burner valve.


Post# 1036070 , Reply# 96   6/22/2019 at 09:10 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/25/2016 by wayupnorth

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

I cut pieces of old rug to the size inside of the knobs to hold them a little out of Ma's last Kenmore as it was doing the same thing, just to keep the metal knobs from digging into the porcelain.

 

 


Post# 1036072 , Reply# 97   6/22/2019 at 09:11 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/26/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Not too sure I'd want to go that route. But thanks anyway Tim! smile


Post# 1036073 , Reply# 98   6/22/2019 at 09:12 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/26/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Well I ordered what I hope to be the correct rotisserie spit rod. The length seems right (19"). The forks have 4 tines instead of the originals 2, but I felt they would be better at securing the meat to the rod. Getting closer.


Post# 1036074 , Reply# 99   6/22/2019 at 09:15 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Originally posted 4/26/2016

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

I may have found a switch that could work for the Caloric.

 

Replacement oven light switch.


Post# 1036076 , Reply# 100   6/22/2019 at 09:23 by Ultramatic (New York City)        

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

Better Because It's Gas, Best Because It's Caloric! Part Two:

 

www.automaticwasher.org/c...





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