Thread Number: 58705  /  Tag: Other Home Products or Autos
Building a New Laundry/Utility Closet
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Post# 812784   3/8/2015 at 00:29 (1,198 days old) by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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As some of you may remember, I have been wanting to build a Laundry/Utility closet in my home for quite some time. While actual construction won't start until mid-spring, I finally started taking measurements and made a simple 3D image.

 

I will be using four 30"x 80" louver bi-fold doors. I would prefer to use 30"x 90", but can not find any. I don't want to go the custom route. The closet will accommodate the Maytag 107, a Kenmore Calypso,  the current GE top freezer in the kitchen and the stacked Kenmore set. My question is, would there be enough ventilation for the refrigerator when the doors are closed? Or should I consider installing a thermostatically controlled exhaust fan? I would never run the washers or the dryer with the doors closed, but the fridge is another matter.

 

 




This post was last edited 03/08/2015 at 01:44



Post# 812786 , Reply# 1   3/8/2015 at 00:33 (1,198 days old) by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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A quick 3D sketch. The dark lavender colored wall would be the new addition.

 

Screenshot (32)


Post# 812801 , Reply# 2   3/8/2015 at 05:06 (1,198 days old) by vacbear58 (Sutton In Ashfield & London UK)        
Alterations

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Louie

Will you have another fridge or or will the GE remain your daily driver? If so I think you will soon get very fed up opening a door to then open the fridge door. If it to be an overflow fridge that is a different matter otherwise it might be better not to have the doors cover the fridge

Al


Post# 812803 , Reply# 3   3/8/2015 at 05:20 (1,198 days old) by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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Oh no, it's going to be an overflow fridge. The kitchen will get the vintage GE I picked up last year.


Post# 812804 , Reply# 4   3/8/2015 at 05:23 (1,198 days old) by sudsmaster (East of SF, West of Eden, California)        

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I've never heard of a combined laundry/refrigerator closet. At the very least you should build ventilation louvers into the doors. This is also recommended for laundry closets that hold clothes dryers, as these need to draw in a fair amount of air.

 

One thing that occurred to be before I read your post was to construct the closet so that the washer and dryer could change positions without having to build new plumbing/ducting. This might mean dual drainpipes and exhaust ducting. The closet in my home was built with the washer connections on the right, which has limited my front loading washer choices. And the closet is too shallow to allow for moving the washer to the left - it just barely fits as is. So that may be another caution: leave plenty of depth in the closet. Washers only seem to be getting bigger.

 

Your drawing indicates a 33" deep closet. I would consider that to be shallow. Remember, not all dryers allow one to vent down or to the side. It also depends on what's on the back side of the wall. Exterior wall, then you can vent directly back. Otherwise, you're going to have to vent to the side or down, which can add to the dimension requirements - if the dryer can do it at all.

 


Post# 812807 , Reply# 5   3/8/2015 at 05:52 (1,198 days old) by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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The closet is going to contain an over flow refrigerator, not a daily use one. The only dryer in there will be a vintage Whirlpool/Kenmore portable on a rack. This dryer will be used rarely. It will be vented to the side, using an indoor lint trap filter. The main, full sized dryer will be in the kitchen, by the window. As for the washers, The Whirlpool/Kenmore portable, the Maytag and the Calypso will have enough clearance. The Calypso for example needs 31" 1/2 deep clearance. And it's the largest of them all. I could increase the depth to 34" if need be.

washer requires a space at least 27 inches wide, and 30 1/2 inches deep. The depth includes a 4-inch clearance at the back and 1-inch clearance at the front.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/list_7563300_kenmore-elite-calypso-specifications.html
washer requires a space at least 27 inches wide, and 30 1/2 inches deep. The depth includes a 4-inch clearance at the back and 1-inch clearance at the front.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/list_7563300_kenmore-elite-calypso-specifications.html
requires a space at least 27 inches wide, and 30 1/2 inches deep. The depth includes a 4-inch clearance at the back and 1-inch clearance at the front.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/list_7563300_kenmore-elite-calypso-specifications.html
requires a space at least 27 inches wide, and 30 1/2 inches deep. The depth includes a 4-inch clearance at the back and 1-inch clearance at the front.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/list_7563300_kenmore-elite-calypso-specifications.html
washer requires a space at least 27 inches wide, and 30 1/2 inches deep. The depth includes a 4-inch clearance at the back and 1-inch clearance at the front.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/list_7563300_kenmore-elite-calypso-specifications.html

 


Post# 812810 , Reply# 6   3/8/2015 at 07:04 (1,197 days old) by sudsmaster (East of SF, West of Eden, California)        

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It's still a fridge, and as such, needs constant ventilation. It's a heat exchanger. How hard would it be to add vented louvers to those doors? And think of future owners/residents. They might want to use the closet as the main laundry washing drying area. As such, vented doors would be a must, maybe required by code.

 

Me, I simply took the louvered doors off my laundry closet. Too much hassle opening/closing them, plus when they were open they stuck out into the hallway, getting snagged. Maybe I just like looking at washers and dryers. The doors are in storage and could be put back on if ever needed (not).

 

 


Post# 812813 , Reply# 7   3/8/2015 at 07:48 (1,197 days old) by pulltostart (Mobile, AL)        

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I tend to think it would be fine, since all of the doors will be fully louvered.

 

However, if you find once things are in place you can still install the exhaust fan.

 

lawrence


Post# 812817 , Reply# 8   3/8/2015 at 09:00 (1,197 days old) by Yogitunes (New Jersey)        

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well, Louie is using louvered bi-folds...(the only bi in that house..lol)....for one, that is more than enough ventilation, not to mention around the sides and top/bottom...

I removed them from my bathroom laundry, for one, you have to close the bathroom door in order to open the left side, these doors also blocked opening the dispenser drawer, and the dryer door from fully opening, not to mention the pedestals...without them, the room seems bigger....as mentioned, their in storage should we ever choose to put them back....

Louie, granted your only putting in the Calypso washer, and using that as a measuring device....consider space if for example, you were putting in the matching dryer, most of it would be the same as the washer, but the dryer has an 'extended' 2 inches on the back which should be factored in......

for that Calypso, you will also want to find hoses with the 90 degree bend, since those fill valves point straight out the back.....not a biggie, but for some installations, can be a pain if you want it close to the wall.....

when considering lighting.....over head is fine, but closest to the front of the closet, or against the front wall seems to work best for where you want it directed.....

not that its in the cards, but for some closets like this, they will add a floor mop sink, for buckets and such, but also with a hanging rod for drip drying clothes....a million ideas....

I want to come help....I like doing stuff like this....


Post# 812850 , Reply# 9   3/8/2015 at 14:09 (1,197 days old) by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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Well Martin, as for a calypso dryer, it would be going into the kitchen, next to the window. I thought about the 90 degree angle hoses, I will definitely get them, so everything can snuggle up to the wall. The machines will rest on flood pans, just in case. I will instal a water cut-off valve under the kitchen sink. Having 18 apartments below you, well, a flood takes on new dimensions. I'll be using PEX for the supply lines and regular PVC for waste. I'm planning on 2 waste stacks, one for the Calypso, the other for the Maytag and the portable.  

 

As for lighting, already have a fluorescent lamp fixture ready to go over the washers. Now I'd LOVE a utility sink in there, but I'd have to let go of the stacked portables. Hmmmmm.

 

I have the room to use bi-fold doors so it's not an issue. Since this is facing the dining room, I don't want the machines on display.


Post# 813537 , Reply# 10   3/12/2015 at 00:11 (1,194 days old) by mrb627 (Buford, GA)        
Perhaps

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Consider a new heat pump dryer in a few years when they become more mainstream?

Malcolm


Post# 813926 , Reply# 11   3/14/2015 at 10:54 (1,191 days old) by Yogitunes (New Jersey)        

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well, not that this would fit into vintage.....but they offer options, stacking, side by side, vent less dryer.....

just some ideas....


CLICK HERE TO GO TO Yogitunes's LINK on Newjersey Craigslist


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Post# 813996 , Reply# 12   3/14/2015 at 21:09 (1,191 days old) by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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I prefer a full sized top loader. Can't get even a jock strap into those. laughing


Post# 813998 , Reply# 13   3/14/2015 at 21:32 (1,191 days old) by cuffs054 (MONTICELLO, GA)        

Well! Brag, Brag, Brag!

Post# 814000 , Reply# 14   3/14/2015 at 21:56 (1,191 days old) by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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ROFL! Oh how I WISH! laughing


Post# 878956 , Reply# 15   4/28/2016 at 19:50 (780 days old) by Ultramatic (New York City)        
One thing leads to another.

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Because of the dishwasher's arrival, I have to reconfigure the supply lines. And move the washer's new lines to the future Laundry/Utility closet.

 

Because I will be using the Whirlpool portable dryer from time to time, I recently purchased and installed a new indoor lint filter called BetterVent. It doesn't use any water, which was a big plus for me. Instead it uses a filter, not unlike an AC filter, to capture the lint/dust. Best filter I've used so far.

 

Palm Springs commercial photography

 

Palm Springs commercial photography



CLICK HERE TO GO TO Ultramatic's LINK

Post# 878959 , Reply# 16   4/28/2016 at 19:58 (780 days old) by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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I am looking for full louver (plantation) bifold doors, 30"x 96" but so far nothing, well nothing that is affordable. HomoDepot has them, but not in any of their stores within a 100 mile radius from where I live. WTF?


Post# 879012 , Reply# 17   4/29/2016 at 11:23 (779 days old) by Yogitunes (New Jersey)        

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was wondering how you were coming along with that laundry area.....

I like a lot of these new filter ideas for indoor venting......

curious of the filter media itself, as there used to be one I had decades ago, that used actual 20x20 heater filters....but to trap the fine lint/dust, I would spray the filter with lemon pledge, or even cooking spray to make it more tacky, granted it filled up a lot faster.....

are these ones reusable/washable or disposable?


Post# 879032 , Reply# 18   4/29/2016 at 16:15 (779 days old) by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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They are cleanable Martin. They recommend cleaning them after 3 uses. You get two to the package. However, the vent has an indicator flap that opens to tell you to clean the filter. So it's a bit confusing. I'll just wait for the flap.


Post# 904133 , Reply# 19   10/24/2016 at 15:55 (601 days old) by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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A question about PEX; Does anyone know the maximum bend for PEX before it kinks?


Post# 904153 , Reply# 20   10/24/2016 at 18:14 (601 days old) by wayupnorth (On a lake between Bangor and Bar Harbor)        

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I have replaced with pex plumbing and it is easily bent out to a 90 degree to where you want it, carefully put in will be no problem. Not as easy as copper or plastic as the pex bend has to take more room not to bend, not as cut and dried like the others. But certainly, in my opinion, MUCH easier.

Post# 904159 , Reply# 21   10/24/2016 at 19:24 (601 days old) by kb0nes (Burnsville, MN)        

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This should cover the PEX install info

www.pexuniverse.com/pex-tubing-te...

What fittings are you using? Press on, crimp sleeve or the Uponor ProPEX sleeves?

We just ran some water lines here at work and used the Uponor system and man is that slick. You heed an expander tool though but it is simple, fast and likely the most reliable join.


Post# 904164 , Reply# 22   10/24/2016 at 20:24 (601 days old) by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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Thanks Tim!

 

Well Phil, not too sure at this time. I will be using PEX-B. I am considering the Uponor system, I need absolutely the most reliable joints. However, it's a relatively small project (longest line will be about 42' in combined length, plus 9 fittings.), so I wonder if it would be more cost effective to rent the tools instead of purchasing them. 


Post# 904171 , Reply# 23   10/24/2016 at 21:26 (601 days old) by wayupnorth (On a lake between Bangor and Bar Harbor)        

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Louie, I used the clamp on fittings on both the red and blue pex pipes from plastic, which is my regular plumbing to new fixtures and everything is fine. Wished there was pex when I redid this place originally in 1995 and I would have done all of it in pex.

Post# 904174 , Reply# 24   10/24/2016 at 22:05 (601 days old) by kb0nes (Burnsville, MN)        

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Well if you won't need the expander tool after you job is done it may be best to rent one, you won't need it for more then a few hours most likely.

We bought a Uponor/Wirsbo manual expander kit on eBay. I think it was about $150 and that came with dies for 1/2, 3/4 and 1". The beauty of the Wirsbo system is that you basically create a tension in the tube and the sleeve that always wants to contract. The spring clamp rings will never increase tension if the material cold flows out of the clamping zone. It is similar to why a Corbin spring-style hose clamp is better then a worm gear clamp.

Here is a link to the Uponor PEX manual, everything you'd ever need to know.

www.uponorpro.com/~/media...




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Post# 904211 , Reply# 25   10/25/2016 at 08:04 (600 days old) by vacerator (Macomb, Michigan)        
Our kids

bought a bank owned repossessed house. Either the former inhabitants, or the contracted maintainanance people cut out some of the copper plumbing, so it has some pex in it now.
It's easy to work with. I used a similar angle stop for a copper toilet supply.
Not a Shark Bite, a Brass Craft push on. No problems.


Post# 904447 , Reply# 26   10/27/2016 at 02:27 (599 days old) by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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My fear are leaks Tim. Being on the 19th floor, it could be a catastrophe. That's why I'm keeping fitting's at a bare minimum. The less joints, the less chances for a leak.


Post# 904448 , Reply# 27   10/27/2016 at 02:32 (599 days old) by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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Thanks for the link Phil. Now I have another question. I know PEX can withstand temperatures up to 200F, I am running 3 lines behind the Caloric stove. Should I insulate? The back of the stove will be about 3 inches from the lines.


Post# 904449 , Reply# 28   10/27/2016 at 02:34 (599 days old) by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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Never heard of Brass Craft Mike. Thanks, I'll look it up.


Post# 904487 , Reply# 29   10/27/2016 at 10:42 (598 days old) by kb0nes (Burnsville, MN)        

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If they were in the wall it would be NO concern at all. Even run directly behind the stove I don't think I'd worry. The area behind the stove probably doesn't reach 200F unless it is enclosed somehow. The lines are full of water so it would take a lot of heat to make them too hot.

Post# 957939 , Reply# 30   9/18/2017 at 00:20 (273 days old) by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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I recently acquired a Frigidaire frost free upright freezer to replace my old chest freezer.  I placed it in the "line-up", where the laundry/utility closet is going. It just barely fit. From left to right, two stacked whirlpool dryers, the space for the Maytag A107 washer, the GE Frost Guard refrigerator, and the aforementioned Frigidaire. Because the new freezer is so wide, I no longer would have space for side walls of the new closet thus, no where to mount light switches, outlets and the intercom. 

 

So I've come to a decision. I have to let go of some of the appliances. It's gotten to the point there is simply no more room to fit so many appliances, and vintage electronics.

 

The Whirlpool portable dryers will be the first to go as soon as I find a decent Maytag DE-806 (blue panel) to replace them. Yes, gasp, I am going to live with ONE dryer. The Maytag A107 washer will be replaced with an A806 that is in comparable condition, I know, a tall order. Next the KDS 19C dishwasher. I was going to part it out, but I just don't have the time. I will swap out the upper rack with my KDS 58. 

 

So in a nutshell, one dryer, 2 washers, 2 refrigerator/freezers, one upright freezer and 1 dishwasher.

 

My husband is doing cartwheels.




This post was last edited 09/18/2017 at 00:57
Post# 985672 , Reply# 31   3/7/2018 at 09:54 by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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A new update. I have most of my plumbing supplies ready. As I mentioned earlier, I am going with the Uponor/Wirsbo pex system. Tubing is Pex-A. I have decided to add an ice maker connection and an outdoor hose cock. The dish washer will have a hot water shut off valve since I will not be using the dishwasher everyday. Each washing machine will have individual shut off valves as well.

 

fullsizeoutput_619


Post# 993486 , Reply# 32   5/8/2018 at 06:40 by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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It has begun. The intercom and light switch will relocated to a new stud wall.


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Post# 995117 , Reply# 33   5/24/2018 at 20:41 by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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Broke through the kitchen and dining room wall. Rough in.

 

Top:  Conduit I am using to protect the PEX A tubing from the sharp metal lathing used in the walls.

 

Bottom:  Is the drain for washers. 


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Post# 995584 , Reply# 34   5/29/2018 at 19:33 by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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Well, the plumbing is complete. This is the first time I've ever used PEX, simple enough, but that expansion tool is tough to maneuver in tight places like under the sink for example.


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Post# 995767 , Reply# 35   5/30/2018 at 23:55 by Ultramatic (New York City)        

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First pressure test. No leaks from the PEX connectors, however, there were 2 leaks from the washer shut off valves. It was between the valve and the PEX brass adapter. All it needed was a slight tightening but, PEX is on tight, you can't twist it, so the only solution was to break the seal rings and remove the entire length of PEX pipe up to the next connector. Then tighten the adapter, and reinstall the PEX with the rings all over again. And it's a new install. Nothing can be reused.  Major pain in the ass. So that's the ugly little secret with PEX.


Post# 996314 , Reply# 36   6/5/2018 at 19:43 by Ultramatic (New York City)        
Leak

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The laundry valves and the PEX A transition fittings were NOT compatible, hence the leak. New valves and fittings installed, no leaks. Also revised the drain pipe, added a P trap. First wash using the Magic Chef (back-up) washer. Also installed the top shelf of the closet. At 10'2" in length, had a hell of a time fitting it into the elevator. Still have to do the electrical, framing work and find some affordable bi-fold doors. Doors have to be 2'3" x 96"(four of them), not a popular size.


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