Thread Number: 75306  /  Tag: Other Home Products or Autos
Gasoline prices
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Post# 991460   4/19/2018 at 21:08 by vacerator (Macomb, Michigan)        

What the heck is going on? Largest hike in years! 50 cents per gallon in one darn day! Was $259 yesterday, and $295 this evening.




Post# 991476 , Reply# 1   4/19/2018 at 22:34 by Launderess (Quiet Please, Theres a Lady on Stage)        
Several things are going on at once....

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First and foremost the "glut" of oil largely has been drawn down.

Next you have the economies of Europe, USA and elsewhere in world expanding and or otherwise recovering nicely from the havoc of credit/financial crises that brought about recessions (if not depressions) all over the world.

And there is OPEC, remember them? www.reuters.com/article/u...


Post# 991490 , Reply# 2   4/20/2018 at 04:12 by DADoES (TX,U.S. of A.)        

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$2.449 for several days+. Was $2.339 for a few hrs one recent morning.


Post# 991494 , Reply# 3   4/20/2018 at 05:16 by appnut (TX)        

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$2.39.  Last Saturday it was $2.32 when I got gas, the next morning it was $2.39 and has remained there. 


Post# 991495 , Reply# 4   4/20/2018 at 05:23 by foraloysius (Leeuwarden, the Netherlands)        

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$7.35 today at the cheapest gas station.

Post# 991498 , Reply# 5   4/20/2018 at 05:56 by Tomturbomatic (Beltsville, MD)        

Our gas stations in Belchville usually had prices that were about 8 or 9 cents a gallon cheaper than in Montgomery County, our neighbor to the west, and stations in NW DC where it was even more expensive. There was something written years ago about different distributors offering varying prices on gas to various stations in various locales, but our Belchville prices are the same now as the Montgomery County stations I pass from time to time. Something has changed. With petroleum, there is always a gun at your back. The only thing that varies is the caliber of the bullets. Everything makes an argument for hybrids and, where possible, electric vehicles.

 

And crude prices are still low enough to harm the economies of Russia, Venezuela and the other sponsors of terror.


Post# 991514 , Reply# 6   4/20/2018 at 09:16 by vacerator (Macomb, Michigan)        
On the CBS radio

station this morning, a report said a Saudi Company wants oil prices of $80 to $100 a barrel.
Well, all I can say is our mid term elections are soon.
I recall June of 2008. The price for regular unleaded here was $4.09 a gallon.
I was out of work, burning gas going to interviews. There were few jobs to be had. The one I found was at half my former salary with no benefits.
In retrospect, I don't know why I didn't file for my unemployment extension.
If I had to work now, I'd claim SS disability. My heel spurs are painful.
I know a loser who got a lawyer and claimed deep depression, and that he is a danger to him self or others and gets over a grand per month.


Post# 991519 , Reply# 7   4/20/2018 at 09:58 by petek (Ontari ari ari O )        

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Ours went up the other day to $1.30 cdn liter.. $3.86 US gal. What pisses me off is the last time it was this high a little over a year ago a barrel of oil was around $105... It dropped down half yet the pump price never did.. and now that the barrel has creeped up a little but still nowhere near $105, the pump prices are going back up there

Post# 991524 , Reply# 8   4/20/2018 at 10:41 by wayupnorth (On a lake between Bangor and Bar Harbor)        

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Hovering around 2.80 here but Sams and BJ's are 2.62.

Post# 991592 , Reply# 9   4/20/2018 at 23:38 by Tomturbomatic (Beltsville, MD)        

Noticed tonight on the way home that WAWA have gone up 4 cents a gallon to $2.69. Noticed that 7-11 was still $2.65 so I filled up at the 7-11. I still think something is rigging this, but I am not waiting 30 minutes in line at Costco nor am I driving 15 minutes up to that cluster fuck in Laurel to save a few cents a gallon. I should be good for another month.

When we got out of the service tonight, Judy discovered that she had left her parking lights on and her old Honda Hybrid does not have an auto off for the headlights. So three of us had a great deal of fun getting her jumped. She had this battery jump thing in her trunk that we used with my 6 LED pocket light and got her started. I guess I will buy one of these things; seemed handy to have not that I have had that many batteries die because I keep tabs on the expire date, but one dead battery in a lonely parking lot makes this worth while especially when one dies before its time. This was a rechargeable thing that hooked to the battery, not of those things that plugs into the cigarette lighter and takes 10 minutes. Does anyone have any experience with one of these devices?


Post# 991597 , Reply# 10   4/21/2018 at 00:50 by Tomturbomatic (Beltsville, MD)        
It's causing 45 pain so it can't be all bad

Surging oil prices rattle President Trump
by Matt Egan and Alanna Petroff @CNNMoney April 20, 2018: 1:07 PM ET
Current Time 01:52
/
Duration Time 11:02

U.S. shale won't spoil the oil rally
The oil market has caught President Trump in an awkward spot between his pro-business instincts and his populist tendencies.

Trump, a major friend to the fossil fuels industry, took OPEC to task on Friday for the recent surge in oil prices. The price has climbed toward $70 in recent weeks, the highest in more than three years.

"Looks like OPEC is at it again," Trump tweeted. "Oil prices are artificially Very High! No good and will not be accepted!"

Trump is right that OPEC, the Saudi-led cartel, has orchestrated higher prices, as it's known to do. And millions of American voters will probably share the president's outrage if gasoline prices soar as a result.

Yet millions of Trump voters also live in states such as Texas, Oklahoma and North Dakota that depend on the oil industry for prosperity. The 2014-2016 oil price crash cost countless jobs and led to dozens of corporate bankruptcies.

Trump has pushed an agenda of American "energy dominance" by slashing environmental regulations and green-lighting pipeline projects.

"These oil-producing states are Trump red states. They're part of his coalition," said Joe McMonigle, senior energy policy analyst at Hedgeye Risk Management, an investment research firm. "To have energy dominance you need higher prices to support investment."

Trump has close ties to Harold Hamm, the billionaire who runs Continental Resources (CLR), a shale oil producer that benefits from higher oil prices. Hamm gave a primetime speech during the 2016 Republican convention, and Trump reportedly considered naming the CEO his energy secretary.

"The president is going to hear from Harold Hamm" about his tweet, said McMonigle, a top Energy Department official under former President George. W. Bush.

Continental Resources did not respond to a request for comment.

Trump portrays himself as pro-business, but he has also attacked major American companies like Amazon (AMZN), threatened to start a costly trade war with China and gone after drug makers for high prices.

Related: Forecast: You'll pay 14% more for gas this summer

Trump's attack on OPEC could also conflict with his efforts to improve relations with Saudi Arabia, the country pulling the strings at the oil cartel.

The timing of Trump's tweet is intriguing because OPEC's strategy hasn't changed recently.

What has shifted is the impact. Oil prices have soared 12% this year, and the price of gas has jumped to a national average of $2.75 a gallon.

That's partly because of production cuts by OPEC and Russia, which have successfully mopped up the huge supply glut that caused prices to crash. Officials from OPEC and Russia met on Friday to take a victory lap for their coordinated action.

"OPEC hasn't done anything different since early 2017," said Spencer Walsh, oil market analyst at IHS Markit.

"The tweet, in my opinion, is a little misleading and not fully factual," he said.

Trump himself shares blame for the more recent jump in oil prices. Geopolitical uncertainty briefly caused by US airstrikes in Syria helped lift prices earlier this month. Oil traders are also nervous about Trump's threats to reimpose sanctions on Iran, a move that could risk up to 1 million barrels per day of oil supply.

"A lot of the reason for higher prices is the president's policy on Iran," McMonigle said. "You're talking about a huge amount of oil at risk. You're going to see prices spike. That's US policy. It's not anything OPEC has done."

And then there's Venezuela, the crumbling OPEC country where instability has driven down production. The Trump administration is considering imposing oil sanctions on Venezuela that could further drive down supply.

"The thing that's kicked up the price is the geopolitical escalation, globally," Walsh said.

Related: Saudi oil shipments to America plunge to 1988 levels

Oil prices have also been lifted by resurgent appetite for energy around the world. Global oil demand grew during the first three months of 2018 by the most since late 2010, according to estimates by Goldman Sachs. The investment bank projected that Brent crude, the global benchmark, will rise to $80 a barrel this year, up from $75 today.

Trump's tweet noted that there are "record amounts of Oil all over the place."

Of course, OPEC and Russia are certainly not pumping at full capacity. Yet production in the US, driven by the shale oil boom, has climbed to record highs. The US is even expected to eventually topple Saudi Arabia and Russia as the world's No. 1 producer.

Trump has sought to encourage more production by cutting environmental regulations. He also advanced the controversial Keystone and Dakota Access pipelines.

What he can't do, at least by himself, is keep oil prices from rising to levels that hurt the economy and upset drivers.

"Other than presidential tweets," McMonigle said, "the federal government doesn't have a lot of tools at its disposal to affect prices."
CNNMoney (New York) First published April 20, 2018: 12:34 PM ET





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Post# 991612 , Reply# 11   4/21/2018 at 04:26 by vacerator (Macomb, Michigan)        
Yes Tom, and, but;

At least 45 is saying he is upset with the increase. We don't know if that is sincere. I'm sure large investors in the oil market may be happy, as many red state voters with that. A lot of pricing is due to speculation as well.
The US also exports a lot of oil, and we haven't had to touch our reserves.
Remember that China has little to no crude, and depends on oil from the US, Russia, and the middle east. The US Navy patrols the Pacific, and sea of Japan and guards the tankers on the way to China.
The pipelines run from Canada through central Oklahoma where the reserve tank fields are, to the gulf ports.
Some are saying fracking will compensate for any supply interruption, but we must also remember that fracking has a limited yield. It's rock, not wells. Same for shale.
A new automotive battery is also on the horizon that can be fully charged in under an hour. This can be a game changer.
However, as trucks and larger SUV's are thirsty, their sales may also be.
I recall Bush saying GM made vehicles nobody wanted. Well we wanted those trucks, because they were selling well, so that's not why they went bankrupt. Bush was in oil, and had influence on pricing. Business owners need trucks to earn their livings if they are in any type of the building trades, landscaping, etc., and can deduct fuel as an expense. However, those with little work, or out of work may have had to sell those vehicles in order to pay other bills. Some were re posessed as well. So sales of all vehicles in general declined harshly.
So we may hurt for a time, but the truth will come out in the wash, as it did in 2008.


Post# 991632 , Reply# 12   4/21/2018 at 12:10 by combo52 (Beltsville,Md)        
Gasoline Prices In The US

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I wish we could catch up with the rest of the world and have prices in the $5.00 per gallon range, the amount of unnecessary driving people do is ridiculous, I see people sitting in their cars all the time with the engine idling, driving too fast and worst of all buying dangerous fuel wasting SUVs, we need a serious shakeup for sure.

Higher gas prices would be about the best thing that could happen for the health of people and the planet.

John L.


Post# 991653 , Reply# 13   4/21/2018 at 14:35 by vacerator (Macomb, Michigan)        
True John,

but we are nor prepared for those high prices. The average Joe would starve commuting to work. In many places, we have no choice but to drive. Europe has way better local, regional, and long distance mass and high speed rail transit.
Much of their high gas prices are the tax, which fund their healthcare, etc.
Most here don't want that. Not yet anyway.
Parking in Europe's cities is also more than congested. Paris still has a smog problem from cars during thee working week days.
Sometimes the need necessitates the wanting. the USA doesn't have the "need yet", but very high fuel prices will spark a want for better mass transit.


Post# 991661 , Reply# 14   4/21/2018 at 15:37 by CircleW (NE Cincinnati OH area)        

It's also about the time stations switch from winter formula to the more expensive one for summer. I saw stations today about $2.75/gal. Last I bought I got for $2.39.

Post# 991695 , Reply# 15   4/21/2018 at 18:36 by vacerator (Macomb, Michigan)        
Yeah, winter me,

summer me. They raise the price for both. Why? You get lower mileage in winter.
I think they add more alcohol for the winter blend.
When Buffa Bush executive ordered the alcohol ratio higher in 2007, mine, and many other's catalytic convertors clogged up. The higher burning temperature caused them to overheat, melt, and clog.
What a dingleberry, making us buy gas we didn't want.


Post# 991696 , Reply# 16   4/21/2018 at 18:53 by wayupnorth (On a lake between Bangor and Bar Harbor)        

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Not just alcohol, but ethanol that screws up all small engines unless you keep the Stabil in it all the time. I buy pre-mixed gas by the quart for $6 bucks a can and my weed wacker starts the first pull. I always do end of the season treatments on my mower and snowblower. People that dont treat their boat motors always run into trouble here.

Post# 991697 , Reply# 17   4/21/2018 at 18:58 by LordKenmore (The Laundry Room)        

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I don't know if it's just ethanol, or if there were other factors instead or in addition too... But I remember a mechanic telling me about 8 years ago how problematic gas had gotten in our area. He was seeing a lot of customers needing fuel filters replaced. And he warned me that he didn't feel that gas lasted as long in a car's gas tank as it had. I think his time line was a month of storage or less. Not that one would have gas sitting that long if one drove regularly--but a month of a car being idle is a real possibility if someone went on a long enough vacation.


Post# 991698 , Reply# 18   4/21/2018 at 18:58 by ea56 (Sonoma Co.,CA)        

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The cheapest unleaded reg is the Mobil Station on my corner, $3.499 a gal, it was $3.239 about 8 days ago, went to the current price about 4 days ago and has stayed there. The Chevron Station near where my husband works, unleaded reg is $3.799, 5 days ago it was $3.659.

And I agree, I hate gas cut with ethanol, it dramatically reduces MPG. Union 78 gas cuts their gas the most. I have kept a notebook in the car for over 40 years to record my MPG, I got into the habit when I had a 67 Buick Skylark that had no functioning fuel gauge for about a year. By recording the gas I bought, how many mile Id driven and the MPG I always knew how much gas I had and never ran out. Anyway, this is why I know Union 76 uses the highest ethanol ratio, because whenever I get gas there the MPG is always about 2 MPG or more less MPG.

I know that the ethanol is supposed to pollute less, but seems like if you have to use more gas for the same MPG, its 6 of one and half a dozen of another.

The abundance of huge SUVs and PUs with usually only the driver and no passengers is so selfish and wasteful. Not only are they polluting more, they are using more of a fuel source with a limited supply. And they contribute to heavier urban traffiic simply because they take up more space. Every time the cost of gas goes down consumers begin buying gas hogs. Then the price of gas goes up and they complain. Oh well.

Eddie


Post# 991699 , Reply# 19   4/21/2018 at 19:13 by LordKenmore (The Laundry Room)        

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The abundance of huge SUV’s and PU’s with usually only the driver and no passengers is so selfish and wasteful.

 

That gets me, too. Of course, I recognize that there are people who do need a SUV or truck, and they won't necessarily be using 100% capacity at all times.

 

But there seems to be many people out there who drive such vehicles for no good reason whatever. And I bet a lot of these people are types who whine about "wasteful" public transit. "You think my big V8 SUV is bad?!?!? I just saw an empty bus!!!!!" (Yes, there are times a bus is empty. But at least in my area, the only way a route survives is if there is regular ridership.)

 


Post# 991703 , Reply# 20   4/21/2018 at 20:29 by wayupnorth (On a lake between Bangor and Bar Harbor)        

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Sorry, but I have a full size Silverado as I need a truck that can plow right thru any snow bank, take or haul, whatever etc. here where I am. Most of the time its only me. Once a month I fill the tank and even though its 5 years old now, I havnt hit 14,000 miles. It has an instant mpg button, best is 21.8, average is 18. I would have bought a smaller truck, but the same dealer I have been with since 1984 could not get me a Colorado when my 1995 Silverado would not pass state inspection with a rusted frame. Old truck was a V6 and got 10 mpg if lucky. This one is a 327 V8 and the instant fuel shut off system for 4 of the 8 does save gas but has alot more balls than my 350 V8 1981 Vette when you need power. I hate to drive anymore after documenting over 2 million miles since legally driving in 1969, I'd prefer to be the passenger from now on.

Post# 991723 , Reply# 21   4/22/2018 at 00:14 by tolivac (greenville nc)        

No,high gas prices would be ridiculous here.Most small towns will NEVER get any sort of mass transit-Greenville does have buses that work ONLY in town.I live and work OUTSIDE of town-and their buses only run during the day-not good for someone that works mids.And if gas prices go up would diesel and aircraft fuel go up too?Not practical.I USED to use mass transit when I lived near DC and went to work downtown.Now my workplace is 15 miles outside of Greenville-so I HAVE to have a car-mine is a Toyota 2016 Highlander Hybrid-LOVE the car.The Hybrid system saves me about 4-6 gal of gas per week.SUVs and giant pickups are great for folks that need them-work crews,construction,farming.Lots of that in my area.city folks really DON'T need huge SUV's and huge pickups.-Unless they are in construction or huge families with a large boat or camper trailer to haul.Work folks need to haul material and tool trailers,even backhoes-so a large pickup or SUV is needed there.

Post# 991740 , Reply# 22   4/22/2018 at 07:17 by vacerator (Macomb, Michigan)        
Then maybe it's time

to write congress before it gets worse.
They at least restored the budget for ecology the new EPA director wanted to cut.
If you need a truck to make a living, then you need one. I have no qualms with that. The newer and lighter ones are far more efficient. Thats why Ford went with aluminum.
We drive far less than we used to, but I am still concerned for those who need to. That old 2003 Impala used to run a hundred miles per day, so no old gas had time to collect. It was the ethanol that ruined the Catalyst. It's still old faithful. rusty now, but hey, for a chuck hole puddle jumper, it's point A to B. If a stone cracks the wind shield, it's not a new car.
If a shopping cart gets thrown in to it, it's an old car.
The state raised our gasoline tax already three years ago to repair roads. Now they are crying they need more money. The bid winners use cheap concrete that doesn't last. They have no integrity. You also get what you pay for, or should.
Our city wants a one time property tax (they say) of one mill to repair roads. thats an average of a hundred dollars per home. It was not approved by residents attending the last council meeting.


Post# 991845 , Reply# 23   4/23/2018 at 05:54 by Tomturbomatic (Beltsville, MD)        

This morning the prices that were $2.69 on Friday night were $2.73. Maybe I will adopt the poor people's driving style of going 10 miles below the speed limit. 


Post# 991856 , Reply# 24   4/23/2018 at 09:08 by vacerator (Macomb, Michigan)        
"poor" people only?

Unless you consider us who aren't millionaires poor. Thats not that wealthy today actually. As a rule, I drive 5 mph over on surface streets, unless kids are out. On the X way, I usually drive 65, so 5 under. Some are doing 80. I'm not in any hurry. Arrive alive I say. Too many texters and talkers behind the wheel.

Post# 991930 , Reply# 25   4/24/2018 at 00:25 by robbinsandmyers (Hamden CT)        

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This is why I'll never get rid of my 18 year old VW TDI @50 MPG and my 84 Mazda diesel truck @38MPG. Why make them rich owning anything that gets under 35MPG?

Post# 991939 , Reply# 26   4/24/2018 at 06:11 by Tomturbomatic (Beltsville, MD)        

Prices up 2 cents this AM with Exxon and WAWA the same at $2.75. I remember a time in the past when a gallon of regular was 3.25.


Post# 991940 , Reply# 27   4/24/2018 at 07:12 by DADoES (TX,U.S. of A.)        

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Noticed yesterday evening that the source of reference went up from 2.449 to 2.499.


Post# 991987 , Reply# 28   4/24/2018 at 16:38 by DADoES (TX,U.S. of A.)        

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Now it went up to 2.599.

I got 57.2 MPG on an errand to the bank and post office this morning.


Post# 991991 , Reply# 29   4/24/2018 at 17:16 by vacerator (Macomb, Michigan)        
Ah? Prius owner? 57 mpg city?

Price here now is $2.75/9.
Dow took another plunge today. Caterpillar said their recent performance of less than optimal for ivestors is their best projected performance. A tech. company also had lower than predicted earnings.


Post# 992008 , Reply# 30   4/24/2018 at 18:46 by Tomturbomatic (Beltsville, MD)        

And the 45-controled Federal Reserve is raising interest rates so that rich people with investments will once again be raking in the moola, regardless of what it does to the country and that is spooking the markets, too. The rich Republicans chafed at the Obama-Yellin plan to hold rates down to encourage growth. I guess now with the inflation that is going to come with the needless and not so popular tax cuts, they are trying to tighten down the valves before there is an emergency.

Post# 992012 , Reply# 31   4/24/2018 at 19:31 by DADoES (TX,U.S. of A.)        
Prius

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No, there are other hybrid and electric vehicles on the market.


Post# 992050 , Reply# 32   4/25/2018 at 06:12 by vacerator (Macomb, Michigan)        
Glenn, which do you drive?

Since you get m.p.g., I know it's not a Nissan Leaf. A Chevrolet Volt? Honda? Focus? Kia/Hyundai? Lexus? Audi? Merc?

Tom, does the president really control the Fed? I liked Yellen, but look what happened when Bernanke was head, and his predecessor used the excuse that they should have analyzed the way things worked better.
I don't think any problems are only to blame on our Federal Reserve. It's a private corporation, yes?
Large accounts are held in Swiss banks. There is the bank of international settlements there, Credit Suisse, etc.
When General Motors filed bankrupt, Robert Lutz was one of the ones at the helm, and one of the ones who asked for a govt. bail out. Know what His father was?
A Swiss financier no less.
Follow the money trails, read between the lines.
The more of us who know and do this and put it out there for others to see may make them aware we are onto the crooked ones. It might help to keep them more honest. After all, it's us who are not rich who suffer in all the shenanigans, as you said. That goes for Wall st. politicians, banks, and corporations.
I know no system of any type is ever perfect. However, you may recall the 1960's when our social security had a surplus, and a bi partisan congressional vote stole it. Had it been left alone, I don't think we'd have a s.s. problem today.


Post# 992057 , Reply# 33   4/25/2018 at 08:05 by Tomturbomatic (Beltsville, MD)        

It's not that the president directly controls the Federal Reserve, but the people that he appoints, like the Chairman of the Board of Governors often share mindsets with him, so he controls it indirectly. Janet Yellin only served one term and could have been asked to serve a second term, but she was of a different mindset, you can't say philosophy because I don't think he can be said to have a philosophy in the true sense of the word, than the president so he accepted the resignation she submitted, properly, when the presidency changed hands because 45's policy was not going to be one to favor safe, regulated growth for all, but rather growth for the rich and powerful and to hell with the rest (and the policies that protected them) who are good for cannon fodder in wars and votes in elections. When it comes to the truth, some of them are willfully uninformed and some of them are products of their environment, soaking up the toxins in which they are raised. They are concerned about losing the status into which they were born because of their white skin. Many have been offered good jobs in other locales, but are unwilling to relocate for the new work and who, while still smarting from all that was robbed from them in the recession that started before 2008, are willing to vote for people who are intent on overturning the laws and regulations to prevent that from happening again.

 

As to your question about the bank's independence, it is considered to be an independent agency that exists outside the cabinet of the executive and its powers are derived directly from Congress. That is why Congress holds periodic hearings where the Chairman of the Board of the Governors of the Federal Reserve answers questions from lawmakers. If you go to the link and tab down to LEGAL STATUS, you can see that it is a hybrid with some features of private corporations and public federal agencies.  



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Post# 992071 , Reply# 34   4/25/2018 at 09:34 by DADoES (TX,U.S. of A.)        

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Ford Fusion Hybrid SE.


Post# 992085 , Reply# 35   4/25/2018 at 13:09 by GusHerb (Chicago/NWI)        

I filled up for $2.66 a gallon on Monday just as gas was on the rise. It was $2.99 at the same station Tuesday. Im highly tempted to look at something like the 2018 Accord Hybrid for my next car as I have a special disdain for the oil industry and would like to support them as little as I can get away with. The Accord hybrid is rated 47 city 47 hwy. I put 15.4 gallons in my car, the trip was at 374 miles which came out to 24 MPG that was mostly city. My car is rated 27 city, its never once achieved that rating in actual stop and go driving.

Post# 992086 , Reply# 36   4/25/2018 at 13:37 by vacerator (Macomb, Michigan)        
Nice Fusion Glenn!

Tom, I get it. It's back to the old white boys club. A lot of women voted for it as well. I spoke with several who said that they saw homeless refugee's in Paris, etc., and didn't want to see that here. Also they expressed concern that without secure borders, we have no country. I bet at least half will not vote the same next time, but incidents such as San Bernardino, Marselles, Las Vegas, Queens, Newark, Barcelona, etc. trigger protectionist ideals.
I think the president is one person and we have checks and balances. The office is not a monarchy, nor an Imperialistic seat.
We are a democratic republic, not only a republic, in the true definition. Not like the German democratic republic which was East Germany.


Post# 992139 , Reply# 37   4/25/2018 at 20:46 by Chuffle (....)        

A jump from $2.95 to $3.09 for regular took place in these parts Monday night.

Post# 992194 , Reply# 38   4/26/2018 at 10:04 by twintubdexter (Palm Springs)        
I sure wouldn't call it a "silver lining"

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But I suppose you could consider "old age" a benefit if you drive as little as I do. 16 years ago when I first moved from Northern to Southern California I was everywhere...LA, San Diego, Venice, even Algodones Mexico. Now I rarely go farther than the grocery store. My retired next-door neighbors have hybrid cars. I visit the gas station much less than they do. All 3 of my vehicles have V8's so with today's prices I guess I'm fortunate to be able to stick close to home. Fortunate too that I don't care to travel anymore.

 

This one's 53 years old and I put 3 or 4 gallons in every 6 months.


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Post# 992203 , Reply# 39   4/26/2018 at 12:25 by Tomturbomatic (Beltsville, MD)        

Similar here. My 4 cylinder Solara is 18 years old and has yet to reach 100,000 miles. I use about a tank of regular gas a month to get to and from Metro station, grocery store, etc. 


Post# 992207 , Reply# 40   4/26/2018 at 12:56 by ea56 (Sonoma Co.,CA)        

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My 2007 Honda Civic is 11 years old now, I bought it new and Ive owned this car longer than any other of the 23 cars Ive owned since 69. It has 57,000 miles on it and I put about 10 gals of gas in it every 3 to 4 weeks. I do very little driving anymore, which is fine with me. I used to really enjoy driving, I would have driven to the bathroom if I had a ramp to it! But the traffic around here is so bad now. Too many people, with too many large vehicles, that they own for vanity, not actual need for work, ect. And too many distracted drivers texting and talking on their phones. Now I drive David to and from work 3 to 4 days a week, a 6 mile round trip, but he is going to retire soon, so I wont need to do that anymore. I drive to the store on Friday to buy our groceries for the week, and the 10 miles Kaiser every other week for allergy shots. I try to walk everywhere that I can. We also go out window shopping, ect., usually once a week. Neither one of use are big on driving anymore. I guess weve turned into bonafide geezers.

I still do enjoy a nice drive on the many country roads in our county, especially on the coast. Thats where I learned to drive and I love to drive on winding roads. To me that is a joy!

Weve been married since 81, and with the exception of one month in 85 weve always gotten along fine with just one car.

As things stand now I can't see myself ever buying another car. My little red Civic is dependable and a pleasure to drive. It still looks and drives like new, no need to buy another. Before I retired I used to buy an new car every 2 years on the average. It was my incentive to drag my ass out of bed everyday to go to work, LOL. I sure wish I had all the money back that I wasted on all these cars.

Eddie


Post# 992282 , Reply# 41   4/27/2018 at 08:04 by Gyrafoam (Roanoke, VA)        

For almost eight years all we heard about was the mantra of "reducing American dependence on foreign oil sources". We endured endless battles over fricking and fracking. We were told how there was now a glut on oil here in the US. And on and on and on.

So now, less than two years later, what happened?

Is it really just OPEC? Could it be something else is driving up the prices?

Me thinks there are many greedy thieves in the same bed with each other.
As usual, guess who is getting f%#ked?

Just to put today's issues in prospective, here is an interesting op/ed from today's American Thinker:

www.americanthinker.com/a...


Post# 992301 , Reply# 42   4/27/2018 at 13:58 by vacerator (Macomb, Michigan)        
I agree Steven

as was with $3 to $4 per gallon gas from 2004 through 2009.

Post# 993142 , Reply# 43   5/5/2018 at 08:00 by DADoES (TX,U.S. of A.)        

dadoes's profile picture

Fill-up this morn (1/8 tank remaining per gauge), $25.63, 10.421 gal, calculated MPG 41.819. Marquee at the store had $2.489. Pump registered $2.459.

Reported MPG from work to store 27.x. Store to home 80.3. MPG Varies widely on individual trips/legs depending on factors -- how much charge in the HV batteries, traffic, stoplight timing, etc.


Post# 993143 , Reply# 44   5/5/2018 at 08:18 by panthera (Rocky Mountains)        
Ah, well

panthera's profile picture

You know - we're going to be dealing with this until we accept that the US solution of mass-transit only for stinky people is not a good solution.

I never drive less than 1000 miles/month.

These prices are just the cost of living in a country where people vote for the 'capitalist' without grasping just exactly what capitalism is.

I've already heard the first 'this is Obama's fault' comments in line at the local station.


Post# 993146 , Reply# 45   5/5/2018 at 08:38 by man114 (Buffalo)        

Ive got multiple vehicles, if the price gets too high I just drive my Mitsubishi Mirage more. Ill enjoy my 54mpg and drive just as much.

Post# 993178 , Reply# 46   5/5/2018 at 14:29 by Tomturbomatic (Beltsville, MD)        

Saw the first $3.09 gas today on Connecticut Ave near Nebraska Ave. in NW DC. Still 2.73 at the WAWA. American Automobile Assn. said to expect $3.00 plus gas this summer.

Post# 993184 , Reply# 47   5/5/2018 at 15:27 by ea56 (Sonoma Co.,CA)        

ea56's profile picture
Its $3.559 a gal for reg unleaded today at the Mobil station on the corner near us. It was $3.499 on Mon when I last filled up, and its been going up every day since. And this is the cheapest gas around here. The Chevron station near the hotel my husband works at it $3.799 a gal for reg unleaded. And we have several refineries within 50 miles or less from here. California always has some of the most expensive gas.
Eddie


Post# 993192 , Reply# 48   5/5/2018 at 16:11 by wayupnorth (On a lake between Bangor and Bar Harbor)        

wayupnorth's profile picture
Some states are lower because of the amount their state charges in taxes. Corporate Energy greedy guys supposedly sets their price, Federal tax added on and then what each state charges for their tax. There can be a big difference in prices from one state to another next door.

Post# 993654 , Reply# 49   5/9/2018 at 17:38 by vacerator (Macomb, Michigan)        
Back up to $3 now,

and with new sanctions against the third largest producer of oil in the world, Iran, expect to see much higher prices soon.
Enjoy, and hope that isn't the worst that happens.


Post# 993696 , Reply# 50   5/9/2018 at 22:33 by GusHerb (Chicago/NWI)        

I filled up for $2.76 at my usual spot today after seeing other places raising it to $2.99. Glad I never traded my car for a gas hog! Those people must be regretting that now... I averaged 26.9 MPG out of this last tank that I went 333 miles on and filled up when it was just over a 1/4 tank.

Post# 993720 , Reply# 51   5/10/2018 at 08:31 by Tomturbomatic (Beltsville, MD)        

Yesterday the price for a gallon of regular went up 10 cents at the WAWA from $2.73 to $2.83. Having a 4 cylinder that uses regular and has long been paid for is a distinct advantage. I have heard predictions of over $3.00 a gallon this summer.


Post# 993724 , Reply# 52   5/10/2018 at 08:58 by foraloysius (Leeuwarden, the Netherlands)        

foraloysius's profile picture
Marginally more expensive: $7.42. I'd love to pay $3.00!

Post# 993742 , Reply# 53   5/10/2018 at 11:04 by firedome (Binghamton NY & Lake Champlain VT)        
agree with John...

firedome's profile picture
gas priced at $5/gal would be beneficial in the long run, it'd force efficiency (of course our moron 45 is trying to undo the upcoming CAFE regs) and force the macho fools in Avalanches and the like out of those useless things. Trades-people who have a real & legitimate reason to own F-350s should get a gas tax break as a business expense, but the poseurs in huge black 14 mpg trucks with bed covers that never come off need to get significantly hit with at least part of the real expense of driving such dumb & wasteful vehicles that contribute greatly to the multi-facted issues facing our environment...and next time, if provoked, as biologist I'll tell you how I really feel!

We're just anxiously waiting for a smallish electric passenger SUV/truck with decent range and some carrying capacity ala the Nissan e-NV200 that they've been selling in Europe for a few years now, that can be charged with our 4.5Kw solar array. Hopefully it will arrive here eventually, they'd sell a ton, I believe.


Post# 993743 , Reply# 54   5/10/2018 at 11:06 by firedome (Binghamton NY & Lake Champlain VT)        
e-NV200

firedome's profile picture
a most practical "green" vehicle, and they make a passenger version too:

cleantechnica.com/2017/10/03/nis...


Post# 993781 , Reply# 55   5/10/2018 at 14:19 by DADoES (TX,U.S. of A.)        

dadoes's profile picture

$2.589


Post# 993792 , Reply# 56   5/10/2018 at 15:53 by vacerator (Macomb, Michigan)        
Louis, Glenn,

Louis, do you have to pay for health insurance? All, or partially? How about prescriptions? Dental?
Glenn, if it's $259, then Texas should not be getting away with it when the rest of us are paying $3.


Post# 993793 , Reply# 57   5/10/2018 at 15:55 by vacerator (Macomb, Michigan)        
Only business owners have any fuel

tax deductions, unless the new ta code eliminated that along with office expenses until you are grossing $150,000.

Post# 993850 , Reply# 58   5/11/2018 at 05:10 by vacerator (Macomb, Michigan)        
Also, unless

you live in the northeast corridor, where they have the Amtrak Accella, and the other commuter rail lines, or Chicago, or San Francisco, we have no choice but to drive to work.
Many, many Europeans have the option of using mass transit and only enjoying their cars on week ends.
Cleveland, Dallas, Los Angeles, Portland Oregon, San Diego do have light rail at least.
Now some places have better bus services than others. Pittsburgh, for example, plus a few subway lines. They even had proposed a Mag Lev train system back in the 90's.
Even China has high speed rail. Also Hong Kong, Kuala Lampur, Singapore, etc., etc.
Face it, the US is behind the times, and big oil has us over the preverbial barrel.
Some day we will hit the concrete wall, and not in a Tesla.
Any car can explode when it hits a wall at a high rate of speed.


Post# 993853 , Reply# 59   5/11/2018 at 06:14 by foraloysius (Leeuwarden, the Netherlands)        
Health insurance etc.

foraloysius's profile picture
Yes, partially, partially and partially.

Post# 994721 , Reply# 60   5/20/2018 at 14:40 by appnut (TX)        

appnut's profile picture

Paid $2.59 a gallon yesterday.  Venezuelan instability will likely cause prices to go higher. 


Post# 994742 , Reply# 61   5/20/2018 at 17:52 by vacerator (Macomb, Michigan)        
Still $2.95 here.

New vehicle in the garage as of Thursday evening. Ford Edge SEL 3.5 litre V6.
Only gets 17 city, 26 highway.
We don't drive much. Hubby didn't care for the Escape. He's taller, felt cramped.
It's a lease, via sons A plan. We'll mainly use it for recreational day trips.
Very nice car.

Our '07 Impala is better on gas in the city. Lighter.


Post# 994743 , Reply# 62   5/20/2018 at 18:01 by Ultramatic (New York City)        

ultramatic's profile picture

 

 

It's jumped to $3.05 for regular, the cheapest so far in my neighborhood. I've seen as high as $3.59 so far.


Post# 994745 , Reply# 63   5/20/2018 at 18:11 by DADoES (TX,U.S. of A.)        

dadoes's profile picture

Up to 2.689 couple days ago. The regional convenience store chain of reference is its own gasoline distributor.


Post# 994746 , Reply# 64   5/20/2018 at 18:24 by wayupnorth (On a lake between Bangor and Bar Harbor)        

wayupnorth's profile picture
2.85 at Sams and BJs and up to 3.05 in the outskirts now. Diesel is up too but heating oil prices are still around 2.50 as nobody needs it now and watch it jump in September.

Post# 994748 , Reply# 65   5/20/2018 at 18:52 by askolover (South of Nash Vegas, TN)        

askolover's profile picture

My 2001 Bug is my commuter...100 miles each day...has 254,000 miles on it all put on by me...and I only fill up every two weeks.  And it doesn't use a drop of gasoline.  No matter how high gas or diesel gets, I still come out ahead at 50mpg.


Post# 994768 , Reply# 66   5/20/2018 at 23:25 by GusHerb (Chicago/NWI)        

Looks like gas is $2.94 at the moment. My recent driving has been giving me an average of 30 MPG and I filled up for $2.69 last monday.




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