Thread Number: 38714
Rebuild of Maytag Transmission and Transplant into LAT 9800 AAW.
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Post# 574194   2/8/2012 at 04:42 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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To the best of my recollection this is my step by step rebuild, with photos, from last summer of a Maytag Newton style trans. put into a newer LAT model. I hope this is helpful to someone.

Here’s the HA408 machine’s top. Almost hated to take it apart. It was salvageable. It came with a HDE606. Second down from TOL (excluding 906 of course). Good shape too.





Post# 574195 , Reply# 1   2/8/2012 at 04:44 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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This is the configuration I used to fill the 408 the first time to check for operation and get the agitator off. Hot supply from inside the house to hot side of valve. Washer hose connected to cold side and the other end in tub.

Post# 574196 , Reply# 2   2/8/2012 at 04:46 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Put in the hottest tap water available with lots of detergent and phosphate.

Post# 574197 , Reply# 3   2/8/2012 at 04:47 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Put a piece of semi-rigid aquarium tubing with soft tubing on the end under the agitator to get at the air bubble underneath the agitator and sucked the air bubble out. Put the machine into agitate for several minutes and then let it set for several more. Reached in with rubber gloves, rocked, pulled and the agitator came off pretty easily. Better than stuffing it with rags and pouring on boiling water, I think.

Post# 574198 , Reply# 4   2/8/2012 at 04:49 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Use PB Blaster and a toothbrush to clean out splined hole.

Post# 574199 , Reply# 5   2/8/2012 at 04:51 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Scrubbed at spanner nut and shaft with PB Blaster and wire brush and let set over night.

Post# 574200 , Reply# 6   2/8/2012 at 04:52 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Spanner wrench and mallet wouldn't touch it. Cracked it off with cold chisel.

Post# 574201 , Reply# 7   2/8/2012 at 04:54 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Mounting stem cover removed. Shouldn't have taken out the clip and washer and dug out the agitator drive shaft seal before lifting out the old mounting stem. I think the old ADS seal could possibly be reused underneath the new style mounting stem if you didn't have a NOS drive shaft seal. It seems as if the extra seal just provides a little push under the new style stem mount for an extra guard against leaks. It might be able to be reused in a pinch if it were cleaned and re-greased. I would be willing to try it if I didn't have a new one. Anyway, I'm saving the old seals in the future.

Post# 574202 , Reply# 8   2/8/2012 at 04:56 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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The underside before any parts were removed. This washer has had a replacement motor.

Post# 574203 , Reply# 9   2/8/2012 at 04:57 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Parts from underneath.

Post# 574204 , Reply# 10   2/8/2012 at 04:59 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Old style Mallory “scritching” timer.

Post# 574205 , Reply# 11   2/8/2012 at 05:00 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Diagram of motor and water valve connections in case I would want to re-assemble the 408 someday.

Post# 574206 , Reply# 12   2/8/2012 at 05:05 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Mounting stem wouldn't budge.

Post# 574207 , Reply# 13   2/8/2012 at 05:06 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Used this...

Post# 574208 , Reply# 14   2/8/2012 at 05:08 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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...to cut off mounting stem.

Post# 574209 , Reply# 15   2/8/2012 at 05:09 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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See how I almost cut too far? The other side was better.

Post# 574210 , Reply# 16   2/8/2012 at 05:10 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Wash basket removed.

Post# 574211 , Reply# 17   2/8/2012 at 05:11 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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These people had undesirable water.

Post# 574212 , Reply# 18   2/8/2012 at 05:13 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Here's the old boot seal while in the tub.

Post# 574213 , Reply# 19   2/8/2012 at 05:14 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Here's the tub bearing still in the tub.

Post# 574215 , Reply# 20   2/8/2012 at 05:16 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Here's the tub bearing removed from the tub and cleaned. The bearing is removed from the tub by elevating the tub with a couple of 2x4's on each side to protect the porcelain drain tube. Puting some turbine oil around the outside of the bearing where the rubber part contacts the porcelain should help remove it. Put a clean cloth over the bearing, put your foot on it and push down while rocking your foot around in a circular motion with gradually increasing pressure until the bearing is pushed from the bottom of the tub. Be patient and don't push hard all at once to keep from damaging the tub.

I cleaned the bearing by first knocking away all the loose particles of dirt and metal shavings I had made cutting off the mounting stem by using a stiff toothbrush brush. Then I dampened the brush with kerosene or other light solvent that isn't harmful to rubber and cleaned the outside of the bearing, used a lint free cloth and polished up the rubber with Pledge. Rubber protectant (Armor All) could also be used too, I guess. After the outside was clean I very carefully wiped out the bronze inside of the bearing with a microfiber cloth. Be careful not to mar it's surface.


Post# 574216 , Reply# 21   2/8/2012 at 05:20 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Bottom view. Pull the rubber back away from the bronze bushing on the bottom of the bearing and saturate the wicking with turbine oil. This is for the old style (fat) bearings. Depending on the age of the bearing it may absorb more or less oil. When the absorption slows down the wicking is saturated and no more oil is necessary. Then put a film of the oil on the inside of the bearing and on the outside of the new spin tube and insert. I put in a new spin tube for good measure. Your old one could be reused if it's not very worn and fits smoothly inside the bearing without any slop between the inter bronze piece and the tube. It should spin inside the bearing like wet ice, gliding on the film of oil. Likewise the tube should also slide easily over the trans. neck with no slop or binding at all. The trans. neck should be polished with a very fine emery paper and wiped completely clean with a lint free cloth until it has a bright satin look to it. The neck, tube and inside of the bearing all have very close tolerances and have to be contaminate free to operate properly for a good spin. If you have the new type bearing apply a coat of oil to both the inside bronze surface and the outside spin surface of the tube and slide together.

Post# 574217 , Reply# 22   2/8/2012 at 05:21 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Bottom view with new spin tube inserted.

Post# 574218 , Reply# 23   2/8/2012 at 05:23 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Off topic, but this is the technique I use to fill an old style (chubby type) tub bearing if you're not going to disassemble the machine. Put 18 gauge needle on hypodermic syringe and fill with turbine oil. An 18 gauge needle base is light pink.

Post# 574219 , Reply# 24   2/8/2012 at 05:25 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Inject bearing with 6 or 9 CC's (ml) of the oil depending on how old the machine is. Clean pulleys, put in new carriage glides if worn and clean and re-lube carriage and glides with poly-lube. Replace belts if glazed, frayed or cracked. Put washer into spin let it spin until the bearing heats up. This should bring spin speed back up.

Post# 574221 , Reply# 25   2/8/2012 at 05:27 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Tub's out. Not too bad considering it's from 1976.

Post# 574222 , Reply# 26   2/8/2012 at 05:28 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Trans. neck with old spin tube still on.

Post# 574223 , Reply# 27   2/8/2012 at 05:29 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Trans. neck with spin tube off.

Post# 574224 , Reply# 28   2/8/2012 at 05:31 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Trans. neck and tube cleaned up. This is the old tube. See how shiny it is? Like I said earlier, I could have probably used the old tube but I elected to go for a new one for hopefully longer wear.

Post# 574225 , Reply# 29   2/8/2012 at 05:32 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Place machine on its side to get to the drive pulley. Legs can be removed for cleaning and removing possible rust at this time also.

Post# 574226 , Reply# 30   2/8/2012 at 05:34 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Remove rubber oil cap.

Post# 574227 , Reply# 31   2/8/2012 at 05:36 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Remove screw, lock washer and stop lug.

Post# 574228 , Reply# 32   2/8/2012 at 05:37 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Spin pulley off counter clockwise. Brake rotor bearing is underneath. Take note of the way the bearing was on. Flat side faces the bottom of machine (upward) and the rounded side faces the pulley (downward). The bottom of the bearing naturally fits over the concave shape of the pulley’s hub.

Post# 574229 , Reply# 33   2/8/2012 at 05:38 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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There's the brake.

Post# 574230 , Reply# 34   2/8/2012 at 05:40 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Take off the brake retainer clip and bolt. If you have the old type brake package you can check the tightness of the hex head bolts that hold the brake together at this time. I thought it was probably wise to do before I started banging on it.

Post# 574231 , Reply# 35   2/8/2012 at 05:41 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Remove brake. It's nice to have a brake package tool for this, but if you don't have it, it can be done with some vice-grips and a hammer. It kind of bungs up the edge of the brake, but I suspect some layers of rubber rapped around the edge of the brake before hammering might protect it. I'd be willing to try it if I didn't have the tool. I was lucky. I got mine for $10.00. The position of the tool in this pic is for tightening. Reverse tool direction to loosen. The transmission will spin when you're removing the brake

Post# 574232 , Reply# 36   2/8/2012 at 05:43 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Brake off. Radial bearing underneath between brake and damper

Post# 574233 , Reply# 37   2/8/2012 at 05:45 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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I use some unorthodox ways of doing things sometimes. I've usually never gone wrong. I soaked the radial and brake rotor bearing in kerosene, turning them while submerged to remove the old grease and put them on a paper towel to dry over night. Then I put the bearings in a double boiler with some new grease and just heated the grease to liquify it a bit and turned the bearing while submerged. This re-impregnated the bearing with new grease. The brake rotor bearing can be packed by hand but the radial bearing is too tight. Not completely sealed but too tight to pack by hand, in my opinion anyway. Take the bearings off the heat and let cool over night. Then dig out and store away in a Baggie for reuse later. If a person had a vacuum chamber or Seal-A-Meal I suppose one could place the bearings in it with some grease to suck out the air and displace it with grease. If the bearings are very worn just replace them. The radial bearing has little or no play. The brake rotor bearing isn't as tight but should spin freely before greased. Of course the kerosene procedure should all be done with neoprene gloves on.

Post# 574234 , Reply# 38   2/8/2012 at 05:47 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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A picture of the underneath side of the damper with the brake off. See the damper pad sticking out between the damper and base? This machine was getting ready to go bad.

Post# 574235 , Reply# 39   2/8/2012 at 05:48 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Remove rubber water deflector from trans stem.

Post# 574236 , Reply# 40   2/8/2012 at 05:49 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Clean drive pulley and parts and use fine steal wool on inside of pulley groove if there's any rubber glazing from the belt.

Post# 574237 , Reply# 41   2/8/2012 at 05:51 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Here's all the rubber parts. I clean these in hot water with lots of soap and a green scratchy pad. Then I take the air dome with hose, fill the dome about half way with baking soda, pour vinegar down the dome, pinch around on the dome, pour in more vinegar until it starts to come out the tube at the other end. I keep repeating this until it's clean. I don't want old muck and hard water deposits to interfere with the water level switch.

Post# 574238 , Reply# 42   2/8/2012 at 05:53 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Then I take all the rubber parts in the previous post, arrange them in the bottom of a pot, pour rubber protectant (Armor All type stuff) over them making sure all the air bubbles are out of the tubes, cover the pot and cook it in the oven at around 175-200 degrees for 24 hours. The parts usually come out like brand new. If they're starting to degenerate this may not work. The bleach tube didn't soften up much, but it didn't hurt it.

Post# 574239 , Reply# 43   2/8/2012 at 05:55 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Removed the bolts and knocked the trans. halves apart with a screwdriver and rubber mallet.

Post# 574240 , Reply# 44   2/8/2012 at 05:56 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Dumped the old oil in a box lined with a plastic bag to be recycled.

Post# 574241 , Reply# 45   2/8/2012 at 05:58 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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The orifice that gets starved for oil when the oil gets thick.

Post# 574242 , Reply# 46   2/8/2012 at 06:00 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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O-ring at the top is the one I ordered from Direct Maytag (Whirlpool) to find the correct size. The three directly below it are from Ace Hardware. The O-ring at the bottom right is the one I cut while removing the mounting stem. The three to the left of it are from Ace. Took the two original rings to Ace Hardware and matched the sizes. The rings are made by Serv-a-lite. The small ring was labeled ORM-206-315. Its measurements are: I.D. 15mm/ O.D. 21mm/ Thickness 3mm. The large ring was labeled ORM-206-325. Its measurements are: I.D. 25 mm/ O.D. 31/ Thickness 3mm. These are the rings to go for. The cost was only about $1.40-$1.50. Much better than the $17.00 Maytag (Whirlpool) wanted for them. Thought you guys might like this info.



This post was last edited 02/08/2012 at 08:32
Post# 574243 , Reply# 47   2/8/2012 at 06:01 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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This is the agitator drive shaft pinion I don't recommend removing. I have been advised that it usually doesn't go very well. I tried and gave up. Even if you get it out there's no guarantee it won't be worse if you CAN reinstall it.

Post# 574244 , Reply# 48   2/8/2012 at 06:03 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Use snap ring plyers to remove the rings over the intermediate gear and the washer that holds down the Pitman arm and gear.

Post# 574245 , Reply# 49   2/8/2012 at 06:04 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Washer over Pitman arm and gear. In some older models there was a cover plate with bolts that held this down and I believe in even older models there was no retainers at all. When you took the cover off the transmission and turned it over to dump the oil the gears would just fall out.

Post# 574246 , Reply# 50   2/8/2012 at 06:05 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Take out Pitman arm.

Post# 574247 , Reply# 51   2/8/2012 at 06:06 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Take out segment gear.

Post# 574248 , Reply# 52   2/8/2012 at 06:07 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Take out Pitman gear. Looks like a weird face.

Post# 574249 , Reply# 53   2/8/2012 at 06:08 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Take out intermediate gear.

Post# 574250 , Reply# 54   2/8/2012 at 06:09 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Pull groove pin out of drive shaft nylon pinion gear.

Post# 574251 , Reply# 55   2/8/2012 at 06:10 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Be careful with this pin. It's small and easily lost.

Post# 574252 , Reply# 56   2/8/2012 at 06:12 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Pull up on drive shaft while spinning counterclockwise.

Post# 574254 , Reply# 57   2/8/2012 at 06:13 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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When you get to the top of the helix you should feel the O-ring start to thread into the helix. Keep turning and the shaft should move slowly past the O-ring.

Post# 574255 , Reply# 58   2/8/2012 at 06:14 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Once the O-ring reaches the end of the helix the shaft should pull straight up and out of the drive tube.

Post# 574256 , Reply# 59   2/8/2012 at 06:15 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Remove the pinion screw off the drive shaft. Don't use anything that could mar the shaft while working on any part of it.

Post# 574257 , Reply# 60   2/8/2012 at 06:17 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Remove the pinion and put a scribe mark on the old hole where the pin went. If the pinion is ever to be used in the future the same hole for the groove pin must not be used.

Post# 574258 , Reply# 61   2/8/2012 at 06:18 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Then the lug and spline washers come off.

Post# 574259 , Reply# 62   2/8/2012 at 06:19 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Put all parts in a smooth container and use a non-shedding brush to clean.

Post# 574260 , Reply# 63   2/8/2012 at 06:20 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Get a pick set.

Post# 574261 , Reply# 64   2/8/2012 at 06:21 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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These worked nicely.

Post# 574262 , Reply# 65   2/8/2012 at 06:22 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Good uses for set.

Post# 574263 , Reply# 66   2/8/2012 at 06:23 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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You can kind of see the old O-ring down in the tube.

Post# 574264 , Reply# 67   2/8/2012 at 06:24 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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The complex pick worked good to dislodge the old ring from the tube and the hook pick pulled it out.

Post# 574265 , Reply# 68   2/8/2012 at 06:26 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Clean the small parts then remove and clean the transmission housing. Be careful not to drop the transmission halves on the bottom of a plastic tub. I did and it cracked it, so I had to grab up the cracked end to keep the kerosene from running out. When I finished I got a funnel and put the kerosene back in the jug.

Post# 574266 , Reply# 69   2/8/2012 at 06:27 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Place parts on lint free towels to dry.

Post# 574267 , Reply# 70   2/8/2012 at 06:28 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Grooved gear studs provide oil to wearing surfaces.

Post# 574268 , Reply# 71   2/8/2012 at 06:29 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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I washed this orifice out repeatedly while turning the shaft. I wanted to get it as clean as possible since it wasn't coming apart.

Post# 574269 , Reply# 72   2/8/2012 at 06:30 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Everything came out really nice. The triangular holes in this intermediate gear indicate OPM at 63. If they were circular it would indicate 54.

Post# 574270 , Reply# 73   2/8/2012 at 06:31 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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See the wear on the inside of this Pitman arm? Probably from millions of turns.

Post# 574271 , Reply# 74   2/8/2012 at 06:32 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Starting the new O-ring down the drive tube.

Post# 574272 , Reply# 75   2/8/2012 at 06:33 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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As I recall, I believe I used the 90 degree and straight pick to install the O-ring. I pushed the lower side of the ring down with the 90 degree pick while pushing the upper side of the ring down with the straight pick and then a combination of the two to situate the ring in the groove below the bushing. I think it took me about 10 or 15 minutes to get the ring in place. I may have started over a second time and put a small amount of transmission oil on the ring to help it slide better. When the bottom edge of the ring was even with the groove I put the 90 degree pick below it to keep it from sliding down any further while using the straight pick to push the rest of its circumference into its resting place. The ring tends to pop into place once it reaches its groove because of the rings natural tendency to expand to its original shape. Absolutely make sure the ring is in its proper place before proceeding.

Post# 574274 , Reply# 76   2/8/2012 at 06:35 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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The compatibility of the oil with this splined washer.

Post# 574275 , Reply# 77   2/8/2012 at 06:35 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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The back label on the gear oil container.

Post# 574276 , Reply# 78   2/8/2012 at 06:37 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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The front of the container showing the GL rating. This oil came from NAPA Auto Parts.

Post# 574277 , Reply# 79   2/8/2012 at 06:38 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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New splined and lug washer.

Post# 574278 , Reply# 80   2/8/2012 at 06:39 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Splined washer goes on top of drive shaft first.

Post# 574280 , Reply# 81   2/8/2012 at 06:40 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Lug washer goes on top of splined washer second.

Post# 574281 , Reply# 82   2/8/2012 at 06:41 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Nylon pinion goes on next.

Post# 574283 , Reply# 83   2/8/2012 at 06:42 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Nickel worked well to tighten pinion screw.

Post# 574284 , Reply# 84   2/8/2012 at 06:43 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Tighten screw and put groove pin in hole closest to top of flat to keep screw from moving.

Post# 574286 , Reply# 85   2/8/2012 at 06:44 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Push pin down flush with top of screw. I noticed pinion is translucent.

Post# 574287 , Reply# 86   2/8/2012 at 06:45 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Pour a small amount of gear oil in a bowl. Apply it to the drive shaft.

Post# 574288 , Reply# 87   2/8/2012 at 06:46 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Coat helix well too.

Post# 574289 , Reply# 88   2/8/2012 at 06:47 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Start drive shaft carefully down drive tube.

Post# 574290 , Reply# 89   2/8/2012 at 06:48 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Maytag originally made a guide to place over the end of the drive shaft that had a spiral that threaded up the helix to make the end of the shaft completely smooth so it would pass by the O-ring easily. If you're careful it can be done without it. Start the shaft down the tube while turning slowly clockwise. When the helix reaches the O-ring it should start to thread its self into the helix. Keep turning the shaft and you should see it slowly pulling its self down pasting the O-ring. When it gets to the top of the helix it will stop moving downward. At this point I grabbed the pinion while slowly turning clockwise and applied a steadily increasing downward pressure. If all go’s well the O-ring will give way and compress itself into the groove and create a tight seal between the drive tube and shaft. Then the shaft should push straight down and the lugs on the washer should engage with the slots in the bottom half of the transmission case.

Post# 574291 , Reply# 90   2/8/2012 at 06:49 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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It should look like this.

Post# 574292 , Reply# 91   2/8/2012 at 06:50 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Replace intermediate gear.

Post# 574293 , Reply# 92   2/8/2012 at 06:51 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Replace Pitman gear and segment gear. I placed segment gear on its stud with the center of the segment in line with the drive shaft center.

Post# 574294 , Reply# 93   2/8/2012 at 06:53 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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You will probably have to reposition the pitman gear to keep the segment gear in line with the center of the drive shaft before replacing Pitman arm.

Post# 574295 , Reply# 94   2/8/2012 at 06:54 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Replace the washer that holds down the Pitman gear and arm. Then replace the snap rings on the intermediate gear and the Pitman assembly.

Post# 574296 , Reply# 95   2/8/2012 at 06:55 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Notice the galling on the agitator drive shaft pinion.

Post# 574297 , Reply# 96   2/8/2012 at 06:56 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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I turned the pinion around 180 degrees so the non-worn side would face the segment gear. This is why I was spending the time to center the segment gear. Now the non-worn side will mesh with the segment.


Post# 574298 , Reply# 97   2/8/2012 at 06:57 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Place a new gasket over the alignment studs on the transmission cover.

Post# 574299 , Reply# 98   2/8/2012 at 06:58 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Pour new gear oil in case.

Post# 574300 , Reply# 99   2/8/2012 at 06:59 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Align the studs on the transmission cover with the holes in the gear housing while keeping the gasket in place and when the two halves start together turn the agitator shaft spline a little bit back and forth to make it engage the segment gear. I found this to be one of the hardest parts of re-assembling the transmission. Everything has to be in perfect alignment for the two halves to go together. You'll notice I ended up using an old chimney tile to support the transmission for reassembly and let the drive tube drop through the umbrella hole in the table. You can't put any pressure on the bottom of the drive shaft as the lugs on the washer have to remain engaged in the casting’s slots of the gear housing. The end of the drive shaft also has to remain protected so the drive lug will mate with the shaft. In my excitement to get this back together I forgot to take a picture of the gear housing after it was filled with oil. The fill is to the top edge of the gear housing.



This post was last edited 02/08/2012 at 08:47
Post# 574301 , Reply# 100   2/8/2012 at 07:00 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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The new patient. LAT 9800 AAW.

Post# 574303 , Reply# 101   2/8/2012 at 07:01 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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This washer has the two speed motor as opposed to the one speed on the 408. I blew the motor out with compressed air and oiled the centrifugal switch.

Post# 574304 , Reply# 102   2/8/2012 at 07:02 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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It also has the different style water injector.

Post# 574305 , Reply# 103   2/8/2012 at 07:02 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Here's the new style tub bearing. Notice the inferior design?

Post# 574306 , Reply# 104   2/8/2012 at 07:04 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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I guess the machine had an agitator shaft seal leak. It had the old style stem mount which uses the old style agitator shaft seal that doesn't go bad as often as the new integrated stem mount and seal, but water was running straight out the tub bearing and down over the transmission, as you can see the streaks on the transmission neck in this picture. By looking at the previous picture you'll notice the severe rusting on the top of the tub bearing. I suppose moisture in the area and movement of the tubs during spin got the top of the tub bearing wet and caused it to rust. During wash the water would run down over the transmission, down the drive tube, over the water deflector, through the holes in the damper and out the bottom of the machine. During spin it would fling water out inside the cabinet off of the spinning transmission. Wash was slow and spin was slow. The drive belt and pulley was glazed. When I pushed against the motor with my foot everything would speed up.

Post# 574307 , Reply# 105   2/8/2012 at 07:05 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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The spin tube is rusted tight on the transmission neck. You can see where the spin tube has been spinning against the tub bearing by the little strip at it's top which isn't as smooth.

Post# 574308 , Reply# 106   2/8/2012 at 07:06 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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I found some old style round motor glides. They work really well.

Post# 574309 , Reply# 107   2/8/2012 at 07:07 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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The base prepared for painting. Old damper pads removed and laying on front of base. I used lacquer thinner to remove the old damper adhesive and damper remnants from the base and masked off the area. This paint is much stronger than anything I could put on, so I decided to clean it and mask it before painting. It will provide a stronger gluing surface for the new dampers.

Post# 574310 , Reply# 108   2/8/2012 at 07:08 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Painted.

Post# 574311 , Reply# 109   2/8/2012 at 07:09 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Working on motor carriage.

Post# 574312 , Reply# 110   2/8/2012 at 07:10 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Together.

Post# 574313 , Reply# 111   2/8/2012 at 07:11 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Poly-Lube label.

Post# 574314 , Reply# 112   2/8/2012 at 07:12 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Carriage back on motor.

Post# 574315 , Reply# 113   2/8/2012 at 07:13 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Glued damper pads on and let dry for a couple of days while I did other things.

Post# 574316 , Reply# 114   2/8/2012 at 07:14 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Put eye-bolts with nuts and legs back on base.

Post# 574317 , Reply# 115   2/8/2012 at 07:15 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Put a tablespoon of transmission oil in brake.

Post# 574319 , Reply# 116   2/8/2012 at 07:16 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Ready to put damper, break and springs back on. Top of brake greased and radial bearing re-inserted.

Post# 574320 , Reply# 117   2/8/2012 at 07:17 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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I put a good coating of Poly-lube on damper pads and put base on damper upside down.

Post# 574321 , Reply# 118   2/8/2012 at 07:18 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Grease threads on inside of damper and screw on brake. Tighten down brake with tool. Replace brake retainer clip.

Post# 574322 , Reply# 119   2/8/2012 at 07:22 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Tub was cleaned, rust removed from damaged porcelain and JB Weld used to repair rusted areas days before. I gave the restored tub bearing a light coating of turbine oil on the outside and pushed back into the tub. I think I was able to push it in with the palm of my hand.

Post# 574323 , Reply# 120   2/8/2012 at 07:23 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Close-up of tub bearing installed. It turned out really nice. Better and cheaper than a new one in my case.

Post# 574325 , Reply# 121   2/8/2012 at 07:24 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Covered the trans. with a plastic bag and then used duct tape around the edge to keep paint and JB Weld off the trans. collar. Sprayed the spline with Rust-Oleum cold galvanizing compound.

Post# 574326 , Reply# 122   2/8/2012 at 07:25 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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I coated the top of the agitator drive shaft with JB Weld thinned with a little water and applied it with a short bristled 1/2 inch wide synthetic artist brush. Don't get carried away with the JB Weld or the stop ring and agitator won't go back on the shaft. This was the only thing I could think of to seal that raw metal. The rust proof coating was long ago rusted away. It will need to dry as long as possible before re-assembly.

Post# 574327 , Reply# 123   2/8/2012 at 07:26 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Dropped trans. down into brake.

Post# 574328 , Reply# 124   2/8/2012 at 07:27 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Coated self-cleaning filters with two coats of JB Weld (one on each side) to create blanks. Blanks used to be available but I couldn't find any.

Post# 574329 , Reply# 125   2/8/2012 at 07:28 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Put spin tube over neck of trans. and carefully lowered the tub over the tube.

Post# 574331 , Reply# 126   2/8/2012 at 07:29 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Underneath view after replacing tub.

Post# 574332 , Reply# 127   2/8/2012 at 07:30 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Post-it on base with eye-bolt thread count for reference.

Post# 574333 , Reply# 128   2/8/2012 at 07:31 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Line up holes in tub with holes in braces and put tub bolts through. Short bolt goes up front by "Caution" label.


Post# 574334 , Reply# 129   2/8/2012 at 07:32 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Put bleach deflector in hole with opening pointing counterclockwise.

Post# 574335 , Reply# 130   2/8/2012 at 07:33 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Here's the order for placement of parts on tub bolts. You should keep these parts for re-use after disassembling.

Post# 574336 , Reply# 131   2/8/2012 at 07:34 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Here's the short bolt up front.

Post# 574337 , Reply# 132   2/8/2012 at 07:35 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Hold the bolt still on the inside of the tub with a wrench and tighten the nut on the outside with a socket.

Post# 574338 , Reply# 133   2/8/2012 at 07:36 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Put some turbine oil down between the tub bearing and the spin tube.

Post# 574339 , Reply# 134   2/8/2012 at 07:37 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Gathering the last replacement parts. Old and new stem mount in view.

Post# 574340 , Reply# 135   2/8/2012 at 07:38 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Rolling large O-ring over agitator shaft collar.

Post# 574341 , Reply# 136   2/8/2012 at 07:39 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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O-ring in chamfer.

Post# 574342 , Reply# 137   2/8/2012 at 07:40 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Put a thin film of dish liquid on the bottom inside of the boot seal and the outside of the tub flange. Grasp the boot seal by the bottom and twist the boot clockwise down onto the flange. Don't grab, squeeze or push on the top of the boot where the carbon ring is. If you damage the ring it's ruined. Keep twisting and pushing down until the boot is against the tub bottom. I struggled with this step quite a bit.

Post# 574343 , Reply# 138   2/8/2012 at 07:41 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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If you have an agitator drive shaft seal, grease it and put it on the shaft with the small side down until it contacts the drive shaft collar. The agitator drive shaft seal was a NOS with a different type of grease than was in the stem seal. Since greases with different types of soap bases aren't supposed to be mixed, I washed the old grease out of the seal with hot water, dish liquid and a toothbrush, being careful not to disturb the spring and washer within. Then I blew the water out with compressed air until totally dry and re-greased the seal with the same type of grease that was in the mounting stem. I used NAPA Premium Performance Multi-Purpose Wheel Bearing And Chassis Grease. It's a lithium complex NLGI No. 2 Consistency. It comes in a 16oz. blue and white plastic container. It's the same color (light honey brown), consistency and smell as the grease that comes in the mounting stem. The amount they placed inside the mounting stem was so small I felt it needed some extra. There was no way to use these parts together without the grease mixing.

Post# 574344 , Reply# 139   2/8/2012 at 07:43 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Close-up view.

Post# 574346 , Reply# 140   2/8/2012 at 07:46 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Grease the inside of the mounting stem threads and put it over the drive shaft. Tighten the mounting stem by turning it counterclockwise. It has left-handed threads. After you have tightened it by hand, put the spanner wrench on it and tap it a few times with a rubber mallet till snug. Hopefully after it's tightened the set screw will not be in line with a water relief groove. The set screw cannot be tightened in this position. It has to bite into the threads on the trans. neck for proper operation. If you find the set screw has stopped parallel to one of the water relief grooves, you can try and tap the spanner wrench a few more times so the set screw will pass the groove and will bite the threads in the neck. You can't be to close to the groove when tightening the screw or it may slip off the threads and bust over into the groove. When I tightened the mounting stem on this machine I found the set screw to stop exactly over one of the grooves and the mounting wouldn't tighten any further so I had to loosen the mounting a bit and tighten the set screw on the other side of the groove. It wasn't what I wanted to do, but there was no choice. It worked and the washer is functioning fine. The marks on the bottom of the tub correspond to the grooves on the trans. neck. You have to make sure the trans. doesn't turn when tightening the mounting stem or the marks have no relevance. Put plenty of grease in the set screw hole before tightening. If the set screw disappears into the mounting stem when tightening you most likely have stopped over a groove. The screw should be tightened enough to make a dimple in the neck but not so hard as to cause the bushing to bind the agitator drive shaft. A good mechanic usually has a feel for this type of thing and knows when to quit, unless the tolerances are with in a narrow range. I haven't found the need for any type of torque guage or wrench when working on a Maytag washer. The tolerances just aren't that narrow. The agitator stop ring (not pictured) goes into the groove on the shaft above the mounting stem seal.



This post was last edited 02/08/2012 at 09:06
Post# 574347 , Reply# 141   2/8/2012 at 07:49 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Hang the springs in the tub supports, tip the tub toward the back of the machine and hook the back springs in the eye-bolts. A ratchet strap will work to connect the front spring. Hook one end of a ratchet strap on the front of the tub, the other under the base and tighten the ratchet until the front spring will connect to the eye-bolt. Put a little grease on the springs where they touch the holes on the tub supports and where they go through the eye-bolts to slow down wear. Tighten the eye-bolt nuts so the amount of threads above the nuts are about the same as the number counted before the machine was dissembled. The spring in the front should be tightened slightly more than the ones in the back for proper operation of the out of balance shut-off. That usually translates into three or four less threads above the eye-bolt nut in the front. Remember when tightening the eye-bolts from above the nut must be turned to the left, or counterclockwise. Later you can check the adjustment of these bolts by washing an item that you know tends to cause out of balance conditions. I have a heavy robe that soaks up a lot of water and is very heavy when wet. I use it to adjust the centering springs for proper operation of the out of balance mechanism.

Post# 574348 , Reply# 142   2/8/2012 at 07:50 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Center the wash basket on the mounting stem, put on the mounting stem cover and tighten the spanner nut.

Post# 574349 , Reply# 143   2/8/2012 at 07:51 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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I snapped the covers into the holes in the bottom of the wash basket.

Post# 574350 , Reply# 144   2/8/2012 at 07:52 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Popped in the agitator.

Post# 574352 , Reply# 145   2/8/2012 at 07:53 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Put on the motor, the pump and the hoses.

Post# 574353 , Reply# 146   2/8/2012 at 07:54 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Put the belts on. The ones on the 408 must have been replaced recently. They were in very good shape and had more cloth on them than new ones, so I used them.

Post# 574354 , Reply# 147   2/8/2012 at 07:56 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Made a diagram, took out the switches, submerged them in kerosene and operated them while submerged, dried them overnight, sprayed them down with silicone, blew out excess silicone, let them sit again overnight, used a wet vac to suck out silicone from openings and seams in the switches, wiped the switches down and re-installed them.

Post# 574355 , Reply# 148   2/8/2012 at 07:57 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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I decided to take the timer out of the control panel for cleaning and lubrication. This machine doesn't have a chrome cap for the timer knob like the older Maytag automatics. The chrome piece is glued to a plastic cap and the cap and chrome piece come off together to expose the clip that holds the knob on the timer shaft. I popped this piece off, took off the clip and knob, took out the hex screws that hold the timer to the control panel, made a diagram of where all the many wires attach to the timer, detached them, took the timer motor off, and gave the timer the same treatment as I did the switches in reply number 147.



This post was last edited 02/08/2012 at 09:12
Post# 574356 , Reply# 149   2/8/2012 at 07:58 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Here's a picture of the timer after the treatment. It's a Kingston timer. You may be able to see its name stamped in the metal just to the left of the Maytag logo and part number. This timer runs very quietly now and turns with ease. I give this treatment to all switches and timers on older machines. I only omit this step if the parts seem very clean and work smoothly and quietly. I believe this greatly extends the life of the part and as these parts are expensive and sometimes hard, if not impossible to find, it's important. Some old timers and switches have wording, markings and designs on them that might be damaged by this process. In that case I would test the areas in question in an inconspicuous or small spot before proceeding. Otherwise I think it's a great way to recondition the parts. It is best to have an air compressor for this step. And a wet vac doesn't hurt. I have experimented on spare parts in the past. I infuse the kerosene with a little oil before I dip it and then let it dry completely. When the kerosene evaporates it leaves a light coating of oil on the part. I wipe the outside down, operate the part, and re-connect it to check it's function in the machine. This is an option if you don't want to spend the money on an air compressor and wet vac.

Post# 574358 , Reply# 150   2/8/2012 at 08:00 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Preparing the washer for its run in. I needed to spin the basket to mate the mounting stem and boot seal. The instructions that came with the mounting stem and boot seal said to install the parts and not put any grease or oil on the carbon face of the boot seal before putting the machine into spin. The service manual said to put a light film of turbine oil on the boot seal face before installing the mounting stem. I opted for the later. I assembled the machine to this point by laying the machine top on the floor, making the connections to the motor per my diagram and instructions I had made at disassembly, blew into the air dome until I heard the water level switch click, clamped the hose with some Vice-grips, turned the timer knob to spin and pulled out the knob. The machine started to spin, the wash basket seemed well centered and the machine was pretty stable even though it was not completely assembled and was on carpet. I let it spin this way for several minutes. If there's any residual oil on the trans., the trans. bolts aren't tight enough or the tub bearing has a bit to much turbine oil in it, the machine will fling oil out from underneath the tub during the spin. Some small specks were coming out during the first couple of minutes. The machine was in a small hallway with paneled walls. I took a cloth and went around the room and wiped the specks off the wall. No harm done. If you're concerned about this you might want to do it outside or in a garage or area that doesn't matter. I took a wrench and went around the trans. and tightened the bolts again. As the new gasket gets saturated with oil it seems to soften a bit and the bolts can be tightened some more. Then I took a rag and wiped the tub, trans., and base down again. Then I turned the knob to wash and let the machine run in the agitate mode for a few minutes. This also worked fine. Then I finished assembling the machine.

Post# 574359 , Reply# 151   2/8/2012 at 08:01 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Time for a water test to check for leaks. The cabinet's back on and all the hoses are attached. The tub cover isn't on yet and the agitator isn't in yet, as can be seen. I don't want that air bubble under the agitator. I want the water to get to all possible leak spots. I'm doing a manual fill with a garden hose. That will work for now. I know the water valve works anyway, as I did a test run when I got the machine to check it's functions.

Post# 574360 , Reply# 152   2/8/2012 at 08:02 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Success. No leaks. Way before this step I made sure the tub, tub cover and tub clamp were clean and mineral free. Polishing the inside edge of the tub, the outside edge of the tub cover and wiping down the tub cover gasket with Pledge makes installing and adjusting the tub cover much easier. Adjust the tub cover to top clearance ( I set mine at around 1/4 inch, close but not touching), slip the tub cover gasket down to the tub edge while holding the tub cover to keep the cover to top clearance from changing, put on the tub cover clamp and tighten (put the tub cover bolts in the 2 and 8 o'clock position, back right and front left corners within the cabinet), connected the water injector, tighten down the machine top, put in the agitator, fill the machine with water, spin out the water and checked for tub cover leaks during spin drain. Then filled the machine with warm water and clothes and did the first wash test. It passed. The out of balance test passed too.

Post# 574361 , Reply# 153   2/8/2012 at 08:04 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Moved the machine to it's new home. My parents house. It replaces that old Sears DD machine.

Post# 574362 , Reply# 154   2/8/2012 at 08:05 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Another view.

Post# 574363 , Reply# 155   2/8/2012 at 08:06 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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A donor agitator that's in excellent condition.

Post# 574364 , Reply# 156   2/8/2012 at 08:07 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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The money shot.

Post# 574365 , Reply# 157   2/8/2012 at 08:08 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Control panel - Left side.

Post# 574366 , Reply# 158   2/8/2012 at 08:10 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Control panel - Middle.

Post# 574367 , Reply# 159   2/8/2012 at 08:11 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Control panel - Right side.

Post# 574368 , Reply# 160   2/8/2012 at 08:12 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Post# 574369 , Reply# 161   2/8/2012 at 08:13 (2,864 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

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Post# 574377 , Reply# 162   2/8/2012 at 09:27 (2,864 days old) by Yogitunes (New Jersey)        

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WOW.....great job.......many thanks for the time to take pics along the way, plus post and describe everything in detail......excellent!


actually this little WOW doesn't even cover it......thats freaking fantastic....you went all out.......absolutely wonderful!!!


Post# 574397 , Reply# 163   2/8/2012 at 12:39 (2,864 days old) by DirectDriveDave ()        

It takes a LOT of time and patience to do what you did. Absolutely amazing job.

Post# 574398 , Reply# 164   2/8/2012 at 12:41 (2,864 days old) by lebron (Minnesota)        

lebron's profile picture
Excellent job and tutorial.

Post# 574442 , Reply# 165   2/8/2012 at 14:59 (2,864 days old) by Yogitunes (New Jersey)        

yogitunes's profile picture
one question.......puzzled why you filled in the self clean filters that snap into the tub?

Post# 574450 , Reply# 166   2/8/2012 at 15:22 (2,864 days old) by lorenatx ()        
lorena tx

hello!!! Im looking for a maytag washer i have a white one and its a dryer


Post# 574453 , Reply# 167   2/8/2012 at 15:32 (2,864 days old) by MaytagA710 ()        

Holy crap! This is an amazing thread. Excellent detail and work. From one Maytag fanatic to another, congratulations, and many thanks go out to you. I will reference this thread when I rebuild the A712's transmission next year.

Lots of great tips and tricks in here. I used that trick you had with the transmission channels, to mark with a sharpie as to where they are at. Excellent idea. Kerosene is an excellent cleaner for gears, bearings, and what have you.

Every time I take a Maytag apart, I am always amazed at the pure genius of the design. Who would have thought to grove the top of the gear posts, so that they can be constantly lubricated? Genius! Guess that can help to why MT transmissions hardly burn out.

This washer will provide you with many many many years of dependable service!


Post# 574469 , Reply# 168   2/8/2012 at 17:54 (2,864 days old) by pdub (Portland, Oregon)        
Incredible!!!

pdub's profile picture
Thanks for sharing all your hard work. I think I spent an hour just reading the entire post. Great job!

Patrick


Post# 574496 , Reply# 169   2/8/2012 at 20:16 (2,863 days old) by AutoWasherFreak ()        

Excellent job! I bet she will run for another 50 years. I would love to do this to my Maytag.


Post# 574499 , Reply# 170   2/8/2012 at 20:33 (2,863 days old) by peteski50 (New York)        
Maytag Rebuild!

peteski50's profile picture
Brian - this is absolutly excellent. I wish they made machines like this today!
Peter


Post# 574511 , Reply# 171   2/8/2012 at 20:57 (2,863 days old) by toploader55 (Massachusetts Sand Bar, Cape Cod)        
Wow...

toploader55's profile picture
What an incredible detailed job.

Out of three Maytags I have, I may rebuild one of my transmissions using this thread.

Thanks so much. The second video is cute. Mom and You watching the Tag disussing the operation. I can't think of many women these days that would be interested in the operation of a machine and what's going on inside.

Thanks Again.


Post# 574563 , Reply# 172   2/8/2012 at 23:57 (2,863 days old) by dnastrau (Lords Valley, PA)        
Excellent job!

I can't add much to what has already been said. Congratulations on a job well done and thanks for the work that you put into documenting the whole procedure!

Andrew S.


Post# 574575 , Reply# 173   2/9/2012 at 01:57 (2,863 days old) by stan (Napa CA)        
Can't tell you

stan's profile picture
how much I enjoyed this, and your attention to detail! I know your Mom appreciates the TLC you put into it! Excellent Job Brian.

Post# 574603 , Reply# 174   2/9/2012 at 06:25 (2,863 days old) by kenmore700bill (Lodi NJ)        

kenmore700bill's profile picture
Brian,
Congratulations on a job well done.. Appreciate the time you took to post all the steps you did with this rebuild. I monitored the thread to check the status of your mission and was glad I did.. You did your homework and did a better job than the Maytag Repair Man..I am sure your Mom will enjoy the Machine.
Again GREAT JOB!!!
Bill


Post# 574664 , Reply# 175   2/9/2012 at 11:51 (2,863 days old) by aldspinboy (Philadelphia, Pa)        

aldspinboy's profile picture
Brian there are some here that has a genius mechanical and restoration talents,
and your are one of them !
What a beautiful job !!!

That was like a symphoney
Wow it's nice that all that work you put into it went to your Mom.
How nice is that... that's LOVE.
She seems she supports you in your craft and that's IMPORTANT.

The machine sounds great to me and maybe she will get a little more quit,
when it wears in more I'm thinking.
Thanks for the time and video's.
Best to you.

Darren k


Post# 574951 , Reply# 176   2/10/2012 at 20:09 (2,861 days old) by queeny77 (BERWYN, ILLINOIS)        

queeny77's profile picture
hope your mom likes it,lots of work went into that. the video reminds me of when me and my mom used to stand over the washer watching it wash.she would prop the lid up with a spray and wash bottle and use a credit card for the lid switch.we sold the maytag to the neighbor when she moved out of state 8 years ago and bought a whirlpool duet cause my dad didnt want to move it,she says she misses her maytag though.


Post# 574994 , Reply# 177   2/10/2012 at 22:50 (2,861 days old) by mixfinder ()        
Blown Away

Anyone who likes Maytags has to be a good guy. Its incredible how few moving parts a Maytag has which makes them dependable but also hard to defend the higher cost when they were new. Your work is spectacular and taking the time to share it all sequentially was a true work of art.
Thanks for all you did.
Kelly


Post# 575262 , Reply# 178   2/12/2012 at 00:42 (2,860 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        
Regarding My Thread

beekeyknee's profile picture
To Martin, Dave, Kevin, Patrick, Jim, Peter, Eddie, Andrew, Stan, Bill, Darren, Keith and Kelly.

Thank you for all the great compliments. It's nice to be complimented by such knowledgeable people.

Martin- I filled in the tub filters because they were added after the orbital transmission was introduced. Its vigorous action caused excessive linting and Maytag thought this would help. I don't think they do much and when I took the machine apart they were mostly covered with this hard, crusty, brown substance. Maytag made blanks for these inner tubs when they were to be used with the Newton transmission (probably during the transition phase), but I couldn't find any so I made my own.

It was mentioned on here quite some time ago that instructions for rebuilding a Maytag transmission with a pictorial would be appreciated and since I was doing it I decided to give it a shot.

I know the thread was extremely long, but I couldn't show it step by step without the length. Even at that, I condensed it to try and cut down on your fatigue. It was a tremendous amount of work that took 8 to 9 months. The documentation and post was about as much work as the mechanical procedure and I doubt I'll be posting anything like that again.

I can't take all the credit for it. It was redcarpetdrew's idea to use the agitator drive shaft seal under the new type mounting stem. I learned a lot of other things by researching posts from different people. I just used their ideas with some of my own, merged them and took pictures.

Thanks again and take care.

Brian

p.s. My Mother is great and she's really smart. She taught me how to do laundry when I was little. She's getting on in years and I wish I could be with her more.

Her Mother was remarkable. She lived through two World Wars and the Great Depression. It seemed like there wasn't anything she couldn't do. She had to or do without. She was very artistic. She could sew, knit beautifully and paint. She even painted a picture of the Golden Gate before the bridge was there.


Post# 575322 , Reply# 179   2/12/2012 at 08:59 (2,860 days old) by magic_clean (Florida)        
A love story?? Brian states:


"It was mentioned on here quite some time ago that instructions for rebuilding a Maytag transmission with a pictorial would be appreciated and since I was doing it I decided to give it a shot".

I'd like to shout out and say thanks for the "in-depth" explanation, pictorial & video of your rebuild. May your mom have many cherished years of Maytag laundering.

L.P.


Post# 669522 , Reply# 180   3/31/2013 at 22:07 (2,446 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        
Since thread resurrection is here...

beekeyknee's profile picture
I thought I would correct an omission, since this thread seems to be referred to occasionally. It's the stop lug adjustment. I will refer to another enlightening thread for this patch. Thank you.

CLICK HERE TO GO TO beekeyknee's LINK


Post# 669533 , Reply# 181   4/1/2013 at 00:31 (2,446 days old) by rinso (Meridian Idaho)        

rinso's profile picture
Brian, congratulations on your success! I am amazed at your skill and patience. The person(s?)at Maytag who designed this transmission had a genius for keeping things simple, operation-wise, but to disassemble and rebuild a transmission that was more easily snapped together on an assembly line takes real talent.

Post# 669869 , Reply# 182   4/2/2013 at 10:01 (2,445 days old) by Jetcone (Schenectady-Home of Calrods,Monitor Tops,Toroid Transformers)        
Read the whole thing

jetcone's profile picture

Brian, very nicely done and very enjoyable. One question though, why you found it so hard to remove the hub for the tub and cut it away? I see that it looks like the stop nut peeking out from the threads, would it not turn back off the stem threads so you had to cut the hub away?

 

jon


Post# 669870 , Reply# 183   4/2/2013 at 10:04 (2,445 days old) by peteski50 (New York)        
Whirlpool!

peteski50's profile picture
Brian - this is really a Great Job!
Peter


Post# 670154 , Reply# 184   4/3/2013 at 05:52 (2,444 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

beekeyknee's profile picture
Jon,

That spot you see on the inside threads of the mounting stem is actually the hole where the set screw was. The picture is deceiving. It looks like the set screw but it's really the set screw hole. I tried to remove the mounting stem with a mini-sledge, but it wouldn't budge. I put PB Blaster on it, but no luck. The sledge I have has a rubber coating over it, so that probably reduced the impact. Next time I'll try a non-coated sledge. I was worried about hitting the inside of the basket and busting the porcelain, but I was still hitting hard. I had to wear ear plugs. Hitting that spanner wrench with my head in that tub is deafening. Talk about having your bell rung. Lol.

I wish they made a spanner that went on a pneumatic driver. Wouldn't that be neat?

Brian


Post# 670174 , Reply# 185   4/3/2013 at 08:36 (2,444 days old) by swestoyz (Cedar Falls, IA)        
The sledge I have has a rubber coating over it

swestoyz's profile picture

You are correct.  Rubber mallets are not intended to drive fasteners or to be used as a hammer.  Looking at the photos and the condition of things, I suspect that if you had used a regular hammer or smaller sledge hammer, both the spanner nut and stem seal would have come off with a few good, hard raps.

 

There's always next time!

 

Ben


Post# 774234 , Reply# 186   7/30/2014 at 21:27 (1,960 days old) by sel8207 (naples, florida 34117)        
nylon gear question

At what point did Maytag decide to have a nylon plastic gear installed in the transmission, when all the other parts are heavy steel? It seems like that gear would be a weak point. Does anybody know what particular year model this nylon gear started, and on what model? Is this gear no longer availabe now? Les.

Post# 774239 , Reply# 187   7/30/2014 at 21:51 (1,960 days old) by ovrphil (N.Atlanta / Georgia )        
whoah!

ovrphil's profile picture
I saved this page - it's a work of art. You and others here blow me away with your level of restorations and abilities. Late to add any comments, my sincere congratulations on your work and fine photo docs.

Phil


Post# 774268 , Reply# 188   7/30/2014 at 23:42 (1,960 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

beekeyknee's profile picture
Thank you, Phil. And because of you I found a dream of mine - the KDS-60 (KDS-20). If I ever need to it's easily converted to an under counter model. Many times these portable machines saw little use.

The reply I made to Jon a couple up was in error. I got to thinking about it over a year after I posted it. The reason I cut the mounting stem off was because the set screw wouldn't come out. I didn't have a drill that would fit in the basket and still have room to drill it out. If it happens again I'll get a 90 degree adapter or small drill to do the job. Cutting that stem off wasn't fun.


  Photos...       <              >      Photo 1 of 2         View Full Size
Post# 774271 , Reply# 189   7/30/2014 at 23:56 (1,960 days old) by combo52 (Beltsville,Md)        
Nylon Gear Question

combo52's profile picture
Every MT AW washer ever built had either a nylon or fiber pinion gear, the nylon ones go back at least to the 70s, in any case I have NEVER seen one fail, so it is diffidently not a weak point.

Post# 774357 , Reply# 190   7/31/2014 at 09:44 (1,960 days old) by ovrphil (N.Atlanta / Georgia )        
".... because of you .."

ovrphil's profile picture
You're welcome, Brian -thank you for even mentioning it. Beautiful KA - the model is a KDS-20 (not sure of the KDS-60).

If this is a dream appliance, you sorted through alot of DW to decide on this one. How does this become selected as a dream KA over all the other KA models? I mean, there are a few others that are visually(my own judgement tool for now) interesting, as well. :-)


Post# 774494 , Reply# 191   7/31/2014 at 23:09 (1,959 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

beekeyknee's profile picture
A KDS-60 is a KDS-20 disguised in a portables clothing. I wanted an 18 or 20 but the 18 never came along and the 20 isn't bad, so I took it. I don't have room for a built in right now, but hopefully I will in the future.

Anyway all this d/w stuff goes with this thread.


CLICK HERE TO GO TO beekeyknee's LINK


Post# 774497 , Reply# 192   7/31/2014 at 23:29 (1,959 days old) by ovrphil (N.Atlanta / Georgia )        

ovrphil's profile picture
Now I know! I just read most of the link you provided. I missed reading that, which often happens to me, as the searching consumes my focus. I arrive at the scene of restoration threads, often last. Oh well.

Thanks again, Brian. It's in great shape and you of course brought it up to a finer looking and operating appliance.


Post# 831961 , Reply# 193   7/12/2015 at 11:03 (1,614 days old) by peteoliver ()        
LA482 Spin issue...

Hello BeeKeeknee,
Thank you for sharing your experience. I have a question regarding a 1984 Maytag LA482. I've read conflicting info as to how the spin cycle gets the basket up to speed. Is belt slippage how this is accomplished or is there some type of clutch? I am hearing a repeating squealing belt sound during the entire spin cycle. It's coming from the motor pulley. The belt appears to be good and moving the motor a bit on the carriage seems to quiet it. Belt tension is set to 1/2" for pump belt as recommended. Any suggestions are most appreciated! Thanks.


Post# 832366 , Reply# 194   7/15/2015 at 09:47 (1,611 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        
Squealing Belt Problems

beekeyknee's profile picture

Pete,

Sorry, I don't check the "My Posts" section of the forum too often. Here's a video of how a Maytag belt and pulley system work. The part about the belt and pulley system is about 1/2 of the way through the video.






The video is from Thread #58081 . If the pulleys on your machine are glazed from belts that the cloth has worn off of,  the motor pulley will squeal against the bare rubber on the main drive belt. I have found that the newer FSP (Whirlpool) replacement belts aren't always of the same quality as the original Maytag belts. I've even used off brand generic belts out of a bin from a local appliance parts store that are better than anything new I've found from FSP. I've also seen what looked to be good generic belts for sale on ebay. As long as the part #'s match or are cross referenced and the belt has the same dimensions and a good cloth cover it shouldn't matter.  I'm sure some purists will want to argue with me but I don't care. If it works it works. A generic belt is on my machine right now and is working better that that FSP thing ever did.  It's the belt with the yellow stripe on it that's going around in the video.  A good layer of cloth wrapped around the belt is crucial for proper operation of the pulley/belt system. Before putting good belts on the machine it is important to clean the pulleys under the machine so the new belts aren't contaminated with the old rubber glaze.

 

Pull the machine out away from the wall, find it's center of gravity on it's two back feet with the back of the control panel propped against the wall. Be very careful during this step. If the machine falls it can do tremendous damage to itself, it's surroundings or you! If the machine doesn't want to slide and it sets on a smooth surface such as finished concrete or tile you can clean a few inches of the floor in front of each foot with Pledge and it will slide much easier. I trust you've cleaned the motor carriage, replaced or checked the glides and put new Polylube back on the carriage and glides? I would do this before changing the belts if you haven't. The best thing to do to stop the squealing is to remove the pulleys, clean off all the old glazed rubber with some solvent and coarse steal wool or a bench grinder with a buffing wheel on it. Replace the pulleys checking them for rough spots. 

 

Basically the system has to have smooth, clean pulleys,  proper sized cloth covered belts, a clean properly assembled motor carriage with good glides that are Polylubed and Maytag springs holding the top and bottom of the carriage together and a properly adjusted pump. It helps to have two people to do the motor/pump adjustment, one to pull back on the motor while the other sets the pump, but it can be done by one. When the motor's pulled back by hand and the pump is pushed toward the right in the slots on the frame a slight motion can be felt in the motor as it starts to just move back toward the drive pulley. This is where the pump should be held in place and tightened down for proper adjustment. This can vary according to the pump belt. If it's old. The pump may move all the way to the right without moving the motor. If it does that's fine as long as the pump belt isn't cracked or chipped and likely to fail. Most of the time the pump belts will out last the machines and it's only the drive belt you have to worry about.

 

Be careful to get your stop lug adjustment right on the drive pulley when replacing it. Now replace the belts (or at least the drive belt) with good ones with plenty of cloth on them. Your originals may have had enough cloth on them at the time but they must be contaminated by now, either from the pulleys not being cleaned properly when you worked on it before or from belts of poor quality that were used the last time they were replaced. This happened to me on my first restore. I won't use poor quality FSP belts again. I examine them closely before installation. A side by side comparison will show the difference. Don't forget to get your machine good and level and use the locking nuts. Little things make a lot of difference.  Just as a side note. The thread you were referring to where I cannibalized a 408 for my mothers LAT9800AAW - the belts on the 408 were in good condition with plenty of cloth and I reused them on her machine. Just because they aren't new doesn't mean they are bad. I checked them thoroughly before using them and they have been serving her well. I hope it hasn't been too long and you find my response.

Brian


Post# 832370 , Reply# 195   7/15/2015 at 10:23 (1,611 days old) by beekeyknee (Columbia, MO)        

beekeyknee's profile picture

Pete,

 

I just reread your post. "A repeating squealing belt sound during the entire spin cycle." That's odd. Are you sure it's coming from the belt? If the machine is getting up to full speed it shouldn't be squealing at that point. Does it squeal more at the beginning of the spin than at the end or is it a steady repeating squeal from beginning to end? Does the frequency of the squeal increase as the machine spins faster? Usually a squealing belt will squeal a lot at the beginning of the spin cycle and then stop as the machine reaches full spin speed.

 

Brian


Post# 834056 , Reply# 196   7/27/2015 at 12:11 (1,599 days old) by bvf ()        
academy award

wow a wonderful job …thanks for taking the time to help all of us…i need to do this to several machines i have…you make it look so easy ill do two by morning…thanks again….

Post# 876084 , Reply# 197   4/8/2016 at 00:17 (1,343 days old) by bvf ()        
amazing job

Hey im going to restore may tags in every color and im glad people take the time to show how it is done …I know in this world how hard it is time wise ..but thanks again for helping me do this process …Its easy to spew information and it is another to document and preserve history for others to reproduce ..thankyou for this information.

Post# 1008790 , Reply# 198   9/27/2018 at 21:03 (440 days old) by eurekastar (Amarillo, Texas)        

eurekastar's profile picture
What a great post! Everything I need to know to overhaul the transmission in my A407!




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